Gonzaga University Zagweb

Course Catalog - Academic Year 2017-2018

This is the course catalog for the current bulletin year. Click on a letter below to view the course subjects that begin with that letter.


Posted: December 12, 2017 ... A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | U | V | W


NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES
NTAS 101 - Intro Native American Studies
Credits: 3.00
This course will explore the histories and cultures of Indigenous groups in North America. While the course will primarily focus on the 19th and 20th centuries, we will also explore Native experiences in early America, and will contextualize later events with those interactions. We will examine Native responses to white settlement, diverse Native reservation experiences, and Native engagement with assimilationist policies like boarding schools and relocation to urban areas. We will also consider the modern era, including outcomes of the self-determination movement for more Native control over tribal governance and economic development. We will engage with literature, film, autobiography, and museum studies to explore these topics, while assessing them from a Native American Studies foundation. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 193 - FYS:
Credits: 3.00
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
Restrictions:
NTAS 199 - Indigenous Science
Credits: 2.00 to 3.00
Biology is the modern scientific study of life and the natural living world. This area of science has provided us with impressive advancements in our understanding of the natural world and human health. However, there exists an enormous amount of traditional indigenous knowledge about the natural world as well. This traditional knowledge is often complementary and convergent with modern science. However, there are significant differences in the ways that these different disciplines look at the world, and differences in what these perspectives can tell us. Spring, odd years.
Lecture: 2.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
Co-requisites: BIOL 199L
NTAS 210 - Indians of Columbia Plateau
Credits: 3.00
This course will explore Native American groups on the Columbia Plateau, including their traditional lifestyles, traditional and colonial religions, the Salish language, and responses to settlement and government policies. We will also examine the traditions of cooperation and collaboration among these groups. We must understand the geography of the Plateau, in order to fully contextualize the importance of homeland and traditional practices, so this course represents place-based study of Native American history. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 211 - Intro Native American History
Credits: 3.00
Hundreds of Indigenous groups made their home in North America for centuries before European colonial expansion reached these shores. Native communities might describe this occupancy as ‘since time immemorial.’ This class will begin with an exploration of those earlier eras and will acknowledge that each Native community was/is distinct from other communities. Thus, while we can observe commonalities in Native experiences and histories, we will also conclude that there is no ‘single’ Native perspective. To develop this conclusion, we will assess processes of change over time across what we now know as the United States. This course will consider social and cultural approaches to preserving and passing down Native American histories as well as U.S. history interpretations of Native Americans’ societies, cultures, economies, and spiritualties. “Texts” in this course will include history books, literature, images, and film, and we will create and respond to research questions using primary and secondary sources.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 310 - Native American Activism
Credits: 3.00
Federal Indian policies and assertions of tribal sovereignty will provide context for discussions of Native American activism. We will discuss regional and national pan-Indian organizations, and we will also recognize the value of community-based activism. Local movements can include language preservation, restoration of traditional foods, community-designed and operated tribal museums and political engagement at all levels of government. Spring, every four years beginning 2014.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 311 - Native American Govt & Politic
Credits: 3.00
This course will see Native American government and politics in a milieu of intergovernmental relations, of community to community connections, or the lack of such relationships. Taking social justice as importantly about relationships, and doing so in respect of governing, I want this course to study how (or how not) federal, state, and municipal governments interact with Native American governments. Spring, even years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 320 - Native American Art & Perform
Credits: 3.00
This course will explore Native American modern art and the historical cultural and artistic practices which informs it. We will also explore Museum Studies as a profession of power and cultural continuity for Native American tribes, and we will review scholarship on Native American museums, including the National Museum of the American Indian. Finally, we will consider performance, in numerous contexts. How does ritual reflect both spirituality and performance? Spring, every four years beginning 2015.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 321 - American Indian Literatures
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to introduce students to several important texts in the multifaceted genre of American Indian literature as well as to invite students into a critical discussion of contemporary issues centering on the relationship between American Indian literatures and contemporary sociopolitical and -cultural realities and issues. We will examine the role of American Indian literature in the continual process of cultural maintenance as well as identity (re)construction. Through close reading of texts by writers from various tribes and regions, students will explore the heterogeneity of Native America and the complexities of all attempts to define or shape indigenous nationhood in the United States. We will contextualize these texts in discussions of social justice issues particular to Native America, including but not limited to the five definitions of genocide; geographical and cultural displacements; and "third world" living conditions. We will also be engaged in dialogues about local and national American Indian cultures in cooperation with the American Indian Studies house on campus. Spring, odd years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
General Requirements:
  Subj/Tst Low High Stdn Attr Req Crdt Min Crse Grd Con
( NMFL 0.00 0 N
) or ( ENGL 104H 0.00 0 N
) or ( ENGL 102 0.00 0 N
) or ( ENGL 105 0.00 0 N
) or ( ENGL 106 0.00 0 N
) or ( NMFL 0.00 0 N
) or ( ENGL 206H 0.00 0 N
) or ( WGST 219 0.00 0 N
) or ( ENGL 201 249 0.00 1 N
) or ( ENGL 251 299 0.00 1 N
) or ( ENGL 207H 0.00 0 N
) or ( TRAN 2LIT 0.00 0 N
) or ( WGST 222 0.00 0 N
) or ( WGST 220C 0.00 0 N
) or ( CLAS 220 0.00 0 N
) or ( WGST 220 0.00 0 N
) and ( ENGL 101 0.00 0 N
) or ( ENGL 200 0.00 0 N
) or ( ENGL 101H 0.00 0 N
)
NTAS 322 - Native American Religions
Credits: 3.00
Traditional Native cultures and contributions along with the cultural stereotypes that distort their reality. Includes the role of Christian missions in forming contemporary Native realities and studies the revitalization movements among North American tribes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 330 - Native Americans & Sports
Credits: 3.00
This course will explore the tradition of sport in Native American cultures, and will examine how Native American athletes have participated in American sports, including football, baseball, basketball, and track. Through literature and documentary films, we will understand the historical context of this participation and also begin to explore social impacts within and outside Native communities. We will also explore the Native American mascot discourses. We will conclude with a very contemporary look at how the Nike N7 program is bringing sport to Native American communities in an effort to improve health through sport, which is leading to a new kind of activism. Course activities will include a visit to Gonzaga's Jesuit Oregon Province Archives to search for primary source materials related to sporting events at Gonzaga during the 1925 Northwest Indian Congress, held in Spokane. Events included numerous track races and culminated with a football game, Haskell Indian Nations University at Gonzaga. Spring, every four years beginning 2016.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 340 - Global Indigeneity
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to explore the pre-colonial indigenous populations of North and South America, Australia, and New Zealand, and to compare the experiences of these groups as they encountered settlers and persisted throughout colonization processes. Spring, every four years beginning 2017.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 341 - Colonial Latin America
Credits: 3.00
A survey of colonial Latin America that examines the contact, conflict, and accommodation among Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans that shaped colonial Latin America.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 359 - America: Invasion to Rebellion
Credits: 3.00
This course will examine the process of colonization on the North American continent. Issues which will be considered include: the world views of the people who eventually lived together in North America, the retentions, borrowings and changes in cultures during colonization, the varied Native American responses to the diverse incoming Europeans and Africans the increasing commitment to racial slavery and the enslaveds’ responses to this, the wide array of assumptions European empires held toward this continent and colonization, and the relationship between the colonies and the empire.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 390 - Native American Studies Topics
Credits: .00 to 4.00
Topics to be determined by instructor.
Other: .00 to 4.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 432 - CIS:
Credits: 3.00
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
NTAS 497 - Exper Learning: Internship
Credits: .00 to 6.00
Professional work experience in a field related to Native American Studies.
Other: .00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
Pre-requisites: NTAS 101 Minimum Grade: D
NTAS 498 - Experiential Learning:Research
Credits: 3.00
The Native American Studies minor at Gonzaga University requires completion of an experiential learning project. The project may either be an internship or a research paper. Must have permission of the NTAS Program Director. Fall, Spring, Summer.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Native American Studies
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
Pre-requisites: NTAS 101 Minimum Grade: C
NURSING
NURS 100 - Nursing Perspectives
Credits: 1.00
This course introduces students to the profession of nursing and seeks to develop in the student the necessary skills and characteristics for successful participation in nursing education at Gonzaga University. The background of nursing and nursing theories, the diverse roles and scope of practice governing nurses in health care, appraisal of healthcare information, the use of technology for research, and the responsibility of nurses in addressing contemporary healthcare issues will be explored. Students are introduced to the mission, ethos, and academic honesty policy of the university and the relationship to nursing, thereby increasing self-awareness and clarifying personal beliefs and goals for professional practice.
Lecture: 1.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Nursing
NURS 210 - Growth and Development
Credits: 3.00
Examines multiple dimensions of individual and family growth and development across the lifespan. Within each developmental stage students examine areas of language, cognition, social-emotional growth and physical development. This course highlights developmental milestones at each stage of the lifespan. Genetic, gender, and cultural influences are considered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: PSYC 101 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 251 - Determinants of Health
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces the ecological framework of health and focuses on one's physical and social environments and access to health care as determinants of health, health disparities, and health inequities. Students will gain an understanding of factors that contribute to illness versus wellness, as well as factors that affect health outcomes and recovery from illness. Students will learn basic community assessment skills, including how to use and interpret basic epidemiological measures.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: SOCI 101 Minimum Grade: C and MATH 121 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 311 - Prof & Therapeutic Comm
Credits: 2.00
This course is designed to provide the learner a theoretical foundation for effective communication. Using the lens of complex adaptive systems and servant leadership, selected models of communication, health and illness, health communication, conflict resolution and negotiation are explored for their implications for nursing practice. Diversity issues affecting perception of health/illness and influencing verbal and nonverbal communication are examined. Media and internet influence on health care and the profession of nursing are included. Theory-based strategies to improve communication skills throughout the health care continuum are stressed.
Lecture: 2.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 210 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 314 - Assessing & Promoting Wellness
Credits: 4.00
Complex adaptive systems, as they relate to body systems, individuals (children, adolescents, adults, and older adults), and families are used as a guiding framework. Theoretical and research-based content in individual and family health and development throughout the life span is emphasized. Students learn foundational skills for the health assessment and care of individuals and family. The student integrates functional health patterns, physical assessment findings, and family concepts to formulate nursing diagnoses and a nursing plan of care. The nursing role in health promotion and health education is emphasized.
Lecture: 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 315, NURS 316
Pre-requisites: NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 210 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 315 - Pract I:Assess/Promo Wellness
Credits: 5.00
Students will use knowledge from Nurs 314 to assess and promote wellness for healthy individuals and families in community settings. Students participate in learning activities in the Learning Resource Center, in a variety of community-based settings, and in post clinical conferences. The course celebrates the body, mind, and spirit of the student in nursing and recognizes that learning transforms. In the process of transformation, reflection provides the key to understanding.
Other: 5.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 314
Pre-requisites: NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 210 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 316 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 316 - Pathophy & Pharmacology I
Credits: 4.00
This is the first of a two course pathophysiology and pharmacology series in the BSN curriculum. The course is designed to improve the learner's understanding of how alterations in normal human anatomic structure and physiology function may impact various organ systems, body homeostasis, and medication management. A student-center case-based active learning model will be utilized to exemplify basic and clinical pharmacology principles for common outpatient disease processes. Nursing pharmacology fundamentals, including principles of drug administration, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse drug effects, drug interactions, and medication errors are introduced. These principles form the foundation for applied pharmacology case studies. Drug class prototypes will be reviewed using an organ system case-based pathophysiologic approach to therapeutics. The case studies illustrate key pathophysiologic and pharmacology concepts thus providing students an opportunity for critical thinking, synthesis, integration, and application of course material to therapeutic decision making, planning, and managing care for individuals.
Lecture: 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Program(s):
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 314, NURS 315
Pre-requisites: NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 210 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 317 - Complexity of Hlth Care System
Credits: 2.00
This course focuses on individuals as members of families/communities who are seeking care within contemporary health care system. Social, economic, political and cultural dimensions of health care delivery are identified and related to healthcare quality. The concept of complexity and its impact on health care is examined. The focus of this course is helping you develop an understanding of the different facets of our health care system so that you have an appreciation of what your patient’s experience is and can work more effectively as a nurse.
Lecture: 2.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 200 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 320 - Stats for Health Professions
Credits: 3.00
This online course provides an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. It includes the statistical procedures used most frequently to analyze quantitative data for health science and nursing research. Emphasis is placed on the conceptual understanding and correct application of statistical tests, as well as the correct interpretation of statistical results. Some mathematical calculation will be necessary. The ultimate goal will be for the learner to understand statistical reasoning and become familiar with the correct use and interpretation of statistics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Nursing
NURS 351 - Care of Individual & Family
Credits: 4.00
This course focuses on the development of nursing competence in planning and managing care for individuals and families with alterations in health status. The course stresses the integration of physiological, pathophysiological, pharmacological and developmental concepts as the foundation for professional nursing practice. Theoretical foundations for the provision of care to individuals and families with alterations in health related to fluid and electrolyte balance and to the reproductive, urinary tract/renal, musculoskeletal, and digestive systems, and some of the more common mental health problems are addressed. Use of theory and research based assessment strategies and nursing interventions required to provide care to these individuals/families in health care organizations are emphasized. Critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning are stressed.
Lecture: 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 352, NURS 356
Pre-requisites: NURS 314 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 315 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 316 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 352 - Indiv & Family w Hlthcare Org
Credits: 5.00
Using knowledge from NURS 351, this course focuses on the provision of care for individuals and families with health care needs related to fluid-electrolyte disturbances, the endocrine, reproductive, urinary tract/renal, musculoskeletal, and digestive systems. Emphasis is placed on the development of self-discovery and the meaning of experience as a reflective practitioner. Students participate in learning activities in the Learning Resource Center, in a variety of clinical settings within healthcare organizations, and in post-clinical conferences.
Lecture: 5.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 351, NURS 356
Pre-requisites: NURS 314 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 315 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 316 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 356 - Pathophy & Pharmacology II
Credits: 3.00
This is the second of a two course pathophysiology and pharmacology series in Gonzaga's BSN curriculum. This course builds on the content and concepts learned in the NURS 316 pathophysiology and Pharmacology I course. It is designed to address more complex pathophysiologic processes which are often encountered in hospitalized acute care patients. A student centered case-based active learning method will be utilized to exemplify advanced clinical pharmacology principles for common inpatient disease processes. Drug class prototypes will be reviewed using an organ system case-based pathophysiologic approach to therapeutics. The case studies illustrate key pathophysiologic and pharmacology concepts thus providing students an opportunity for critical thinking, synthesis, integration, and application of course material to therapeutic decision making, planning, and managing care for individuals.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 351, NURS 352
Pre-requisites: NURS 314 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 315 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 316 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 357 - Complexity w/ Healthcare Org
Credits: 2.00
This course considers organizations as complex work environments that have implications for workplace safety and health care errors. Nursing roles in the delivery and maintenance of safe, quality care are emphasized.
Lecture: 2.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 317 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 390 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.00 to 5.00
Topic to be decided by faculty.
Other: 1.00 to 5.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Nursing
NURS 402 - Care of Individuals & Families
Credits: 4.00
Focuses on the continued development of nursing competence in planning and managing care for individuals and families with complex alterations in health status. Stresses integration of physiological, pathophysiological, psychological, and pharmacological concepts as essential to professional nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on development of focused assessment skills needed to provide care to individuals and families with health care needs related to the cardiovascular, neurological, endocrine, pulmonary, renal, and mental health systems.
Lecture: 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Co-requisites: NURS 403
Pre-requisites: NURS 351 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 352 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 356 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 403 - Pract III:Care of Ind & Fam
Credits: 6.00
This course focuses on providing care for individuals and families with chronic and complex health care needs related to the cardiovascular, neurological, endocrine, pulmonary, renal and mental health systems. Examines internal resources (such as faith or spiritual health) as a source of nourishment when making decisions--especially those involving ethics, urgency, reaction and immediacy. Students participate in learning activities in the Resource & Simulation Center, in a variety of clinical settings within healthcare organizations, and in post-clinical conferences.
Lecture: 6.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Co-requisites: NURS 402
Pre-requisites: NURS 351 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 352 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 356 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 404 - Research & Info Management
Credits: 3.00
Provides an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research principles and methodologies, including evaluation of research studies and application to practice. Critical analysis of nursing and health care research is emphasized. Stresses research design, sampling, data collection strategies and ethical considerations in research.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 320 Minimum Grade: C or BUSN 230 Minimum Grade: C or MATH 121 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 406 - Nursing Research
Credits: 3.00
This course provides an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research principles and methodologies, including evaluation of research studies and application to practice. Critical analysis of nursing and health care research is emphasized. The course stresses research design, sampling, data collection strategies, and ethical considerations in research.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 320 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 417 - Design Mng Coord Hlth Care
Credits: 2.00
This course analyzes the role of the nurse in designing, managing and coordinating health care for individuals, groups, families and communities in a complex adaptive system.
Lecture: 2.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 357 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 418 - Complexity in HlthCare Org
Credits: 3.00
This course considers quality, safety and error reduction within complex healthcare organizations in the United States. Healthcare policy, health care transitions, interdisciplinary health care and social-cultural implications are explored. The nursing role in the delivery and maintenance of safe, quality care of the patient and family are emphasized using current competency models.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 432 - CIS:
Credits: 3.00
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Nursing
NURS 463 - Community Health
Credits: 3.00
Designed for the licensed registered nurse, this course introduces community-as-partner model as a guide for providing cost-effective, accessible care for families, groups, and populations. Emphasis will be placed on cultural competence, the use of complex adaptive systems to understand the interaction among and between systems within community health practice, epidemiological concepts in the development of effective health policy/programs, and ethical dilemmas inherent in the community-as-partner model of practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 464
NURS 464 - Community Health Practicum
Credits: 3.00
This practicum emphasizes the use of the community-as-partner model to guide community health practice. Students will explore the various dimensions of a healthy community as they actively participate in community health practice that emphasizes assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating cost-effective, accessible care for families, groups, and populations within a complex adaptive system. Students will expand their cultural competence, apply epidemiological concepts in the development of effective health policy/programs, and gain an appreciation of the ethical dilemmas inherent in the community-as-partner model of practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 463
NURS 465 - Prof Nurs Prc Complex Adpt Sys
Credits: 3.00
Considers nursing leadership roles within complex adaptive systems and examines transition to the professional role. Servant leadership principles are connected to nursing leadership.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 466, NURS 467
Pre-requisites: NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 418 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 466 - Population Focused Health
Credits: 4.00
This course will address communities and populations as the clients for nursing interventions. The focus of this course is interventions used to promote and improve population health. A particular emphasis will be interpreting assessment and epidemiological data to identify and prioritize community/population problems and selecting appropriate interventions for an identified population health problem. Learners also will be introduced to selected principles and theories that underlie population-focused interventions. Program planning and evaluation processes and strategies will be considered. Use the criteria of effectiveness, efficiency, equity, security, and liberty to analyze a public health policy.
Lecture: 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 465, NURS 467
Pre-requisites: NURS 402 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 403 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 404 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 467 - Prac IV:Partner Pop Hlth Pract
Credits: 3.00
This is a project-based practicum course. Students will work in an assigned community agency to develop a comprehensive plan for addressing an identified population health problem. This course will give students experience in working in evolving population-focused indirect, nursing roles as a project developer/leader and consultant. Practicum experiences will be intentionally designed to give students experience collaborating with professionals from a variety of other helping disciplines. Students will be expected to interact with their assigned agency and its clients on a regular basis.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 402 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 403 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 404 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 468 - Prac V:Member of Nurs Profess
Credits: 3.00
This capstone course is designed to facilitate the transition from the role of student nurse to that of a professional nurse through an intensive practicum experience in a clinical setting of the student's choice. With the guidance/supervision of an experienced registered nurse preceptor, the student has the opportunity to synthesize and apply knowledge and skills gained in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program, demonstrate competencies for entry level nursing practice, and practice nursing leadership within a complex adaptive system (CAS). There is continued emphasis on the significance of reflection as a way of gaining the insights needed to achieve safe, high quality, client-centered practice and effective, ethical leadership. Students examine their own clinical practice and leadership in light of the characteristics of servant leadership. Each student develops an individualized learning contract in collaboration with faculty and the clinical preceptor; the learning contract articulates the student's goals and specific strategies for meeting them. EACH STUDENT PRACTICUM REQUEST WILL BE SUBJECT TO REVIEW BY THE BSN LEAD FACULTY TO DETERMINE FINAL CLINICAL PLACEMENT.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 315 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 352 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 403 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 469 - Nursing Leadership & Mgmt
Credits: 2.00
This course focuses on the professional nursing roles of the nurse leader/manager as a change agent, advocate, and role model for others in the health care setting. The course addresses the management skills of scheduling, budgets, delegation, and information technology, and explores health care policy, finance and regulatory environments. In addition, this course addresses the nurse leader’s role in maintaining clinical expertise, effective communication, flexibility, collaboration and conflict resolution.
Lecture: 2.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 100 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 251 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 418 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 490 - Clinical Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Assists nurses in period of transition from nursing student to registered nurse or from one practice setting to another. Adaptation to role transition fostered through preceptorship with expert clinical RN and through interaction with faculty. Opportunities to both practice and master current knowledge and skills and acquire new ones.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Nursing
NURS 492 - Clinical Update Level I-III
Credits: 1.00 to 5.00
Opportunity to pursue a nursing project or topic of choice with guidance of a faculty member.
Other: 1.00 to 5.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 496 - Independent Practicum
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Opportunity to explore a clinical field or an expanded nursing role with guidance of a faculty member and a clinical preceptor.
Other: 1.00 to 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Nursing (Post RN)
NURS 497 - Internship
Credits: .00 to 6.00
Requires completion of a form, department permission and cannot be registered for via Zagweb.
Other: .00 to 6.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 498 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Seminars designed to address special topics in nursing and health care, based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite: permission. Fall, Spring, Summer - On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 499 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Seminars designed to address special topics in nursing and health care, based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite: permission. Fall, Spring, Summer - On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 523 - Adv Pathophysiology
Credits: 3.00
This course seeks to assist learners to understand the cellular pathophysiological basis of disease. The content emphasizes cellular, genetic, and biochemical processes. Pathophysiological and physiological concepts form the basis for critical thinking and decision making when assessing and treating individuals with various disease processes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
NURS 524 - Adv Pharmacology
Credits: 3.00
The course is designed to prepare the learner for an advanced practice role with prescriptive authority. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles will be applied to the pharmacotherapeutic treatment of disease. Medications will be studied according to therapeutic categories and drug classes within the framework of organ-based pathophysiologic disease state processes. Emphasis will be placed on the medications that are commonly used (top 200 drugs) in primary care settings with special attention given to evidence-based medication selection, patient education, and medication monitoring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Pre-requisites: NURS 523 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 561 - Info Tech & Data Mgmt
Credits: 3.00
This course explores the many uses of information technology and data management. The course will provide learners with the knowledge and skills in information and healthcare technology needed to enhance communication and interprofessional collaboration in the current healthcare environment. The process of locating, accessing and analyzing information and data is applied to advanced practice roles, enhancing patient safety, quality & outcomes, and improving population health.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 562 - Theor Fdn Hlthcare Improvement
Credits: 3.00
This course provides a theoretical orientation to become change agents in a variety of healthcare settings and diverse practice populations. The course will provide learners with a foundation in theories significant to nursing practice such as complex adaptive systems, organizational and change theory, leadership and team-building models, and quality improvement and care models needed to assess, design, plan, implement, and evaluation quality improvement project to promote patient-centered care and improve program outcomes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
NURS 563 - EBP for Quality & Safety
Credits: 3.00
This course will provide learners with a theoretical and practical foundation for identifying and critically appraising evidence from qualitative and quantitative research traditions. The emphasis is on the examination of the essential elements of evidence-based-practice, including the formulation of answerable questions to address quality improvement and safety in a variety of advance practice roles and the systematic search for research evidence that can be used to answer researchable questions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
NURS 564 - Contemp Hlthcare Env
Credits: 3.00
This course explores the ethical and legal principles of healthcare and their impact on accessible, affordable, and quality care. This course will provide learners with a framework for discussing ethical and legal issues with an emphasis on the ethical delivery of care to individuals, families and populations. The scope and standards of advanced nursing roles will be examined along with current issues and policies that address health care disparities, health care organizations, financing and quality. Strategies for analyzing and influencing public, professional and institutional policies related to health care and its delivery will be considered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 565 - Clin Prev for Diverse Pops
Credits: 3.00
The focus of this course is on the development of health promotion and disease prevention programs for diverse groups and populations. Selected concepts of epidemiology, broad determinants of health, population health, clinical prevention and cultural competence will be examined as they relate to the design and delivery of equitable clinical prevention and health promotion interventions and/or services to individuals, families, communities and aggregates/clinical populations.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
NURS 600 - Hlth Assessment: Adv Nurs Prac
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to extend and refine the assessment skills of the Registered Nurse in preparation for an advanced clinical practice role. The student will learn to perform physical, developmental, mental, emotional, cultural, social, and family assessments. Students will review anatomy and physiology related to each biological system being studied. The course emphasizes in-depth techniques for assessing each body system in individuals throughout the life span. Lectures will focus on the use of a variety of health assessment techniques, including history taking skills, physical assessment, and other diagnostic assessment tools. Application of diagnostic reasoning and patient education to the assessment process will be included in the content. This course incorporates approximately 13 hours of supervised laboratory experience and 60 hours of precepted clinical experience. Laboratory and clinical components of the course focus on helping the student to develop communication, observation, and psychomotor skills and to document history and physical examination findings. Satisfactory progress in the clinical setting is required to pass the course. Two, two day on-campus immersions required.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Co-requisites: NURS 601
Pre-requisites: NURS 523 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 524 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 601 - Adv Health Assessment Pract I
Credits: 1.00
This course is the practicum course paired with NURS 600 Advanced Health Assessment. The focus is on the practice of advanced assessment skills within a primary care setting. Students must complete 60 clinical hours in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner or physician.
Lecture: 1.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Law
Law Non-Matric
Graduate Non-Matric
Graduate
Co-requisites: NURS 600
Pre-requisites: NURS 523 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 524 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 601E - Patho, Pharm & Asmt I
Credits: 3.00
This course provides students with an in-depth analysis of concept-based pathophysiological problems with emphasis on assisting learners in understanding the cellular pathophysiological basis of disease, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics principles of its pharmacological treatment and the refinement of physical assessment skills used to form the basis for critical thinking and decision-making when treating individuals with various pathophysiological problems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 602E - Patho, Pharm & Asmt II
Credits: 3.00
This course is a continuation of NURS 601E and provides students with an in-depth analysis of concept-based pathophysiological problems with emphasis on assisting learners in understanding the cellular pathophysiological basis of disease, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics principles of its pharmacological treatment and the refinement of physical assessment skills used to form the basis for critical thinking and decision-making when treating individuals with various pathophysiological problems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 603E - Adv Clin Prct: Acute Care
Credits: 1.00
Students complete 60 hours of direct care activities with a master’s prepared nurse in an acute care setting. Particular emphasis is placed on safety, quality of care, and quality improvement activities. Students are provided with the opportunity to integrate previous knowledge and develop proficiency in a focused area of acute care clinical nursing.
Other: 1.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 604E - Adv Clin Prct: Pop-Focused
Credits: 1.00
Students complete 60 hours of direct care activities with a master’s prepared nurse in a community setting. Particular emphasis is placed on safety, quality of care, and quality improvement activities. Students are provided with the opportunity to integrate previous knowledge and develop proficiency in a population-focused area of clinical nursing.
Other: 1.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 565 Minimum Grade: C and ( NURS 601E Minimum Grade: C or NURS 602E Minimum Grade: C )
NURS 631A - Hlth Syst Leader Practicum I
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
This practicum integrates knowledge from the didactic courses in the health organization setting.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
General Requirements: 1 courses
  Subj/Tst Low High Stdn Attr Req Crdt Min Crse Grd Con
( NURS 641A 0.00 0 N
) or ( NURS 642A 0.00 0 N
) or ( NURS 643A 0.00 0 N
) or ( NURS 644A 0.00 0 N
) or ( NURS 645A 0.00 0 Y
)
NURS 632A - Health Systems Leader Prac II
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
This practicum integrates knowledge from the didactic courses in the health organization setting.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 631A Minimum Grade: C
NURS 633A - Health System Leader Pract III
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
This practicum integrates knowledge from the didactic courses in the health organization setting.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 632A Minimum Grade: C
NURS 641A - Nursing Leadership Development
Credits: 3.00
This course advances the student's understanding of concepts introduced in the common core with a focus on the role of the nursing leader within the complexity of healthcare organizations. Emphasis is placed on the development of a professional plan and portfolio that reflect the intentional selection of a personal model of nurse leadership. Consideration is given to the use of change management theories in promoting organizational as well as personal and professional changes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 642A - Quality & Information Manage
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the information management skills essential for effective nursing leadership in complex healthcare settings. Topics to be addressed include clinical information systems, benchmarking, and quality monitoring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
General Requirements:
  Subj/Tst Low High Stdn Attr Req Crdt Min Crse Grd Con
( NURS 551 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 564 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 552 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 562 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 553 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 563 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 554 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 561 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 555 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 565 0.00 0 N
)
NURS 643A - Communication & Relation Manag
Credits: 3.00
This course addresses the role of the nurse as a healthcare systems leader in developing and sustaining relationships with employees and other healthcare providers within complex healthcare environments. Course content will address communication strategies, relationship management, conflict management and negotiation skills, and evaluation. Concepts related to legal, regulatory, and ethical aspects of employee hiring, performance evaluation, and termination will be reviewed. Consideration will be given to succession management.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
General Requirements:
  Subj/Tst Low High Stdn Attr Req Crdt Min Crse Grd Con
( NURS 551 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 564 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 552 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 562 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 553 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 563 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 554 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 561 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 555 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 565 0.00 0 N
)
NURS 644A - Health Care Management
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the financial management skills essential for effective nursing leadership in complex healthcare settings. Topics to be addressed include financing, administrative, financial, cost accounting systems, and budget development and oversight.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 561 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 562 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 563 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 564 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 565 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 645A - Legal, Regulatory, & Ethic HC
Credits: 3.00
This course addresses the role of the nurse as a health systems leader in relation to legal, regulatory, and ethical considerations in health care environments. Complex adaptive systems is used as the framework for examining legal and regulatory constraints that affect care delivery, patient and employee rights and responsibilities, and quality management, including patient safety and risk management. Tension between legal and ethical guidelines will be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
General Requirements:
  Subj/Tst Low High Stdn Attr Req Crdt Min Crse Grd Con
( NURS 551 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 564 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 552 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 562 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 553 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 563 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 554 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 561 0.00 0 N
) and ( NURS 555 0.00 0 Y
) or ( NURS 565 0.00 0 N
)
NURS 645E - NE Pract in Clinical Setting
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Students complete 60-180 of the required 240 hours of preceptored teaching experience in an approved clinical setting providing student, patient and/or staff education. The experience will include classroom teaching, as well as supervised evaluation of participant learning and performance. The course included on-line clinical conferences.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 601E Minimum Grade: C and NURS 602E Minimum Grade: C and NURS 651E Minimum Grade: C
NURS 646E - NE Pract in Academia
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Students complete 60-180 of the required 240 hours of preceptored teaching experience in approved academic setting. The experience will include classroom and clinical teaching, as well as supervised evaluation of student work and performance. The course includes on-line clinical conferences. There is a two to three day on-campus capstone immersion focusing on issues of professional development, transition to the nurse educator role, and legal and ethical issues inherent in academic and service settings.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 653E
Pre-requisites: NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 602 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 651 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 651E - Curriculum Development
Credits: 3.00
This course addresses strategies for developing curricula, ranging in scope from individual teaching sessions, to courses, to complete programs of study. Emphasis is given to developing a curriculum that is congruent with institutional and program mission, philosophy, and goals; professional standards; needs and expectations of an educational program’s communities of interest; contextual variables; and learner characteristics. Students are introduced to "backward design" principles, the concept of "threading" content, strategies for sequencing content, using a theoretical/conceptual framework to inform a curriculum, and principles of curriculum evaluation, focusing on both content validity and outcomes achievement. Legal, ethical, and accreditation issues related to curriculum content also will be considered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 651P - PC: Gender Based
Credits: 2.00
This course focuses on the role of the Family Nurse Practitioner in the care of women and men with common pathophysiological alterations in gender related health. Focus is on clinical management of preventative, acute and chronic health problems in women and men who present for care in primary care settings. Emphasis is placed on the FNP’s role in performing comprehensive health assessment (including ordering and interpretation of appropriate diagnostic tests), diagnostic reasoning (differential diagnosis), and prescription of pharmacologic and non-pharmacological interventions.
Lecture: 2.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 661P
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 652E - Teaching/learning Strategies
Credits: 3.00
This course explores strategies for teaching in classroom, online, clinical and community settings and emphasizes linking teaching-learning strategies to desired learning outcomes. Theoretical frameworks for teaching-learning, assessing and accommodating learning styles, preferences, and readiness to learn will be considered. The course also addresses adapting content to teaching strategies for different groups of learners (e.g., students, health care consumer/patients, professional colleagues) and learners with different characteristics. A two to three day on-campus immersion focusing on simulation technologies is required. The course will explore strategies to enhance interprofessional collaboration through the educational process. Students will use their clinical specialty area as context for course assignments.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 651E Minimum Grade: C
NURS 652M - PMH Nurse Concepts I
Credits: 3.00
Designed as an induction into advanced practice psychiatric-mental health nursing. The scope of practice and standards of the psychiatric nurse practitioner are analyzed. Major emphasis is placed on building a therapeutic relationship, assessing, and diagnosing major psychiatric disorders mental health promotion/prevention strategies, and diagnostic decision-making is stressed. Risk assessments and formulating diagnoses using DSM V, are emphasized and other phenomena requiring clinical intervention, considering variations across the lifespan. Selected theories of interpersonal psychotherapy, human development, recovery, and trauma informed care across the lifespan are analyzed. The biological bases of psychosocial behavior and their implications in psychiatric care are explored. Integration of concepts and application in one's personal practice are stressed.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 661M
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 670 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 652P - PC: Infant, Child, Adolescence
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the role of the Family Nurse Practitioner in the clinical management of preventative, acute and chronic health problems in infants/children/adolescents who present for care in primary care settings. Emphasis is placed on the NP’s role in performing comprehensive health assessment and treatment (including ordering and interpretation of appropriate diagnostic tests), diagnostic reasoning (differential diagnosis), and prescription of pharmacologic and non-pharmacological interventions. The FNP’s role in management and referral to other health care professionals and community resources for individuals and families will be emphasized (e.g., coordination of care transitions within and between health care systems for children with developmental delay).
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 662P
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 653E - Principles of Eval for NE
Credits: 3.00
This course examines the basic principles of evaluation and provides practical guidelines for evaluation of learning in academic, clinical and community settings. The course includes content on test construction and evaluation, developing and using rubrics, developing and grading written assignments, evaluating clinical performance, and evaluating personal teaching effectiveness. The course also addresses program evaluation and accreditation. Legal and ethical considerations related to evaluation and grading will be discussed. (One day test writing seminar included in the NURS 646E on-campus capstone immersion.)
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 646E
Pre-requisites: NURS 651E Minimum Grade: C
NURS 653M - PMH Nurse Concepts II
Credits: 3.00
The focus of this course is on the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic mental health issues. Emphasis is on individual and group psychotherapy across the lifespan. Development of therapeutic relationships and interpersonal processes in psychotherapy are examined. Continued development of therapeutic relationships, self-awareness, and skill in assessment, diagnosis, and care formulation are emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 662M
Pre-requisites: NURS 652M Minimum Grade: C or NURS 661M Minimum Grade: C
NURS 653P - PC: Adult/Geriatric I
Credits: 4.00
This course focuses on the role of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) in the clinical management of chronic and complex health problems in adults and elders who present for care in primary care settings. Emphasis is placed on the NP’s role in performing comprehensive health assessment (including ordering and interpretation of appropriate diagnostic tests), diagnostic reasoning (differential diagnosis) and treatment, prescription of pharmacologic and non-pharmacological interventions, and patient education, follow-up, co-management or referral.
Lecture: 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 663P
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 654M - PMH Nurse Concepts III
Credits: 3.00
Focuses on the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic mental health issues. The course will have an emphasis on individual, group and family psychotherapy interventions. Development of therapeutic relationships and interpersonal processes in psychotherapy are examined. Theoretical models for individual and group psychotherapy are analyzed for their application and presenting issues in therapy situations of patients/clients of varying ages and diagnoses are emphasized. Self-awareness; continuing development of knowledge and skill in assessment, diagnosis, and care formulation; and integration of theories and techniques of psychotherapy for application in one's personal practice are stressed. Strategies in treating chronic mental health disorders are considered. The indications for and selection of appropriate theoretical models, diagnostic strategies, and/or intervention techniques, and issues in treatment situations of patients/clients across the age span are emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 663M
Pre-requisites: NURS 652M Minimum Grade: C or NURS 661M Minimum Grade: C
NURS 654P - PC: Adult/Geriatric II
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the role of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) in the clinical management of chronic and complex health problems in adults and elders who present for care in primary care and other settings. Emphasis is placed on comprehensive health assessment and treatment (including ordering and interpretation of appropriate diagnostic tests), diagnostic reasoning (differential diagnosis), prescription of pharmacologic and non-pharmacological interventions, and patient education. The course also emphasizes the NP’s role when referring to other health care professionals, community resources, and interdisciplinary teams.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 664P
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 661M - Psyc-Mntl Hlth Practicum I
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
This clinical course is paired with the didactic course Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Concepts I. Emphasis is on utilizing the theories, concepts, and skills necessary to assess and diagnose acute and chronic psychiatric disorders and the development of clinical intervention.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 652M
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 661P - PC: Gender-Based Practicum
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
This course is the clinical course paired with the didactic course Primary Care Gender-Based. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing. Students must complete 60 to 180 clinical clock hours in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either an MD or a NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the development of skills in caring for the adult male and female population with health concerns.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 651P
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 662M - Psyc-Mntl Hlth Practicum II
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
This clinical course is paired with the didactic course Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Concepts II. Emphasis is on the application of treatment interventions including medication management, individual, group psychotherapy for the adult clients.
Other: 1.00 to 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 653M
Pre-requisites: NURS 652M Minimum Grade: C or NURS 661M Minimum Grade: C
NURS 662P - PC:Inf,Child,Adol Pract
Credits: 2.00 to 3.00
This course is the clinical course paired with the didactic course Primary Care Infant, Child and Adolescent. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing. Students must complete 120 clinical clock hours in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either an MD or a NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the development of skills in caring for the population of infant through adolescent with health concerns.
Other: 2.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 652P
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 663M - Psyc-Mntl Hlth Practicum III
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
This clinical course is paired with the didactic course Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Concepts III. Emphasis is on the application of treatment interventions including medication management and individual and group psychotherapy for the child/adolescent and elderly client with acute, chronic, and co-occurring disorders.
Other: 1.00 to 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 654M
Pre-requisites: NURS 652M Minimum Grade: C and NURS 661M Minimum Grade: C
NURS 663P - PC:Adult/Geriatric Pract I
Credits: 3.00 to 4.00
This course is the clinical course paired with the didactic course Primary Care Adult/Geriatric I. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing. Students must complete a minimum of 120 clinical clock hours in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either a physician or NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the development of skills in caring for the adult/geriatric population with health concerns in primary care settings.
Other: 3.00 to 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 653P
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 664P - PC:Adult/Geriatric Pract II
Credits: 2.00 to 4.00
This course is the clinical course paired with the didactic course Primary Care Adult/Geriatric II. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing. Students must complete a minimum 120 clinical clock hours in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either a physician or NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the development of skills in caring for the adult/geriatric population with health concerns in primary care and other settings.
Other: 2.00 to 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 654P
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 665P - PC:Adult/Geriatric Pract III
Credits: 2.00 to 3.00
This course is the clinical course paired with the didactic course Care of the Frail Elder. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing in a long-term care setting while caring for frail older adults. Students must complete a minimum of 120 clinical clock hours (2 credits) in an approved clinical setting while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either a physician or NP).
Other: 2.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 671
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 670 - Psychopharmacology
Credits: 3.00
The course covers the principles and theories of psychopharmacology, the examination of, epigenetics, genetics, neurochemical communication, circuits in psychopharmacology, the effects of various psychotropic drugs, and the actions of drugs used to treat psychiatric disorders. The course examines the actions and use of specific psychotropic medication, required monitoring and the management of behavior and mental illness.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 523 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 524 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 671 - Care of Frail Elder
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the clinical management of the elder in primary care. Emphasis is on principles of gerontological care, common syndromes, ethical issues, abuse/neglect, and care options within the long-term care (LTC) continuum. The course includes a clinical application experience in a LTC setting.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 665P
Pre-requisites: NURS 600 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 601 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 672 - Mental Hlth in Adv Practice
Credits: 3.00
This course is foundational for advanced practice nurses when providing care to patients with common mental health disorders. Content includes neurophysiologic, genomic, environmental, social, and developmental theories to understand the etiology and presentation of common mental health conditions. Psychopharmacological and non-pharmacological principles and modalities for treatment of common mental health problems will be explored.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 683M - Psyc-Mntl Hlth Pract Extension
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
This course is an independent clinical course. It is not paired with a didactic course. It is designed to allow Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner students to continue to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing in semesters when they are not enrolled in NP specialty didactic courses. Students will complete variable clinical clock hours in approved clinical settings while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either a physician or NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the continuing development and refinement of treatment interventions including medication management and individual and group psychotherapy for any population.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 661M Minimum Grade: C
NURS 683P - Prim Care Pract Extension
Credits: 1.00
This course is an independent clinical course. It is not paired with a didactic course. It is designed to allow Nurse Practitioner students to continue to apply concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing in semesters following completion of the NP specialty didactic courses. Students will complete variable clinical clock hours in approved clinical settings while supervised by a nurse practitioner, physician, or physician’s assistant (unless in a state that requires the preceptor to be either an MD or a NP). The focus of this clinical experience is on the continuing development and refinement of skills in caring for any population with health concerns in primary care or other approved settings.
Other: 1.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 663P Minimum Grade: C and NURS 662P Minimum Grade: C and ( NURS 654P Minimum Grade: C or NURS 651P Minimum Grade: C )
NURS 690 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Courses designed to address special topics in nursing, based on student and faculty interests.
Lecture: 1.00 to 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
NURS 691 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topic to be determined by instructor.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 692 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Independent study requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB. (Cannot be used to fulfill elective requirement).
Other: 1.00 to 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Restrictions:
NURS 700 - Theoretical Fdtn of Nrs Pract
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on examining philosophical and scientific knowledge development in nursing practice and the implications for practice. Emphasis will be on the analysis, critique, and application of nursing middle-range and other related theories to nursing practice.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 563 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 708 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 701 - DNP Pract I: Appl of EBP
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
This practicum course provides the student an opportunity to work within a practice setting to begin to design his or her scholarly project. The student also begins to establish the expanded advanced nursing DNP role focusing on a population of interest. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 761
Pre-requisites: NURS 700 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 702 - DNP Pract II: Appl of EBP
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
The DNP student works with a faculty mentor to begin implementation of his or her scholarly project. The student also establishes the expanded advanced nursing DNP role focusing on a population of interest. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 762
Pre-requisites: NURS 701 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 761 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 703 - DNP Pract III: Appl of EBP
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
The DNP student continues to work with a faculty mentor to implement his or her scholarly project. This includes analysis of data and drafting a report of the scholarly project. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 763
Pre-requisites: NURS 702 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 762 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 704 - DNP Pract IV: Appl of EBP
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
In this final practicum course, the DNP student completes the implementation and evaluation of his or her scholarly project. The student also completes the final written report of the project and disseminates the finding s through preparation of a bound document or a manuscript suitable for a peer-reviewed publication along with an abstract that is submitted for a podium or poster presentation at a major conference. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 764
Pre-requisites: NURS 763 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 703 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 705 - DNP Immersion
Credits: 1.00
The on-campus 'immersion' must be completed by all DNP students within a semester or two prior to enrolling in NURS 701 and NURS 761. This course introduces students to Jesuit values and ethical decision-making. Students also learn about the DNP role, expectations, and the importance of crystallizing their ideas for their scholarly projects early in the program. Requirements for completion of an IRB application, guidelines for formation of a Scholarly Project Committee, the proposal and final defense processes, and steps to complete a scholarly project are emphasized. Students are oriented to library databases for distance students and creation of an electronic portfolio. They are introduced to the fundamentals of writing for publication and participate in an interactive session designed to bring focus to their scholarly projects.
Lecture: 1.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Pre-requisites: NURS 700 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 708 - Inferential Statistics
Credits: 3.00
The purpose of this course is to review statistical concepts, such as descriptive statistics, probability distributions (binomial and normal), sampling distributions, inferences (point estimates and confidence intervals), hypotheses testing (one-sample tests, two-sample tests), Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), as well as simple linear regression and multiple regression analysis. The course emphasizes the application of statistical concepts to analyze research for best available evidence to support quality nursing practice. The course also provides students with hands-on experience in using statistical software (Mega Stat) to assist in making effective decisions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 710 - Population-Focused Care
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on developing and evaluating health promotion and disease prevention interventions targeting population-based health. The environmental, socioeconomic, and cultural context of health behaviors will be explored. The use of epidemiology and evidence-based research to inform clinical prevention programs and policy solutions for population health disparities are emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 720 - Evidence Synth for Practice
Credits: 3.00
This course emphasizes how to create answerable questions relevant to the role of Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) to address specific patient/client problems or situations and critically appraise types of data generated through research in both qualitative and quantitative traditions. The focus is on evaluating the adequacy of research questions, methodologies, and the presentation of findings. The DNP will be prepared to use epidemiological data to identify the causes of disease and to evaluate health services. In addition, the course emphasizes an examination of knowledge transformation, including the systematic search for research evidence to answer research questions and the synthesis of evidence for knowledge translation across a body of research.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 730 - Clin Prog Dev, Impl, & Eval
Credits: 3.00
This course emphasizes the steps involved in the development of a business plan for creation of a new clinical service or program or a clinical practice. Students will learn about conducting a needs assessment, developing mission and values statements, creating the program design, conducting a financial analysis, and designing evaluation strategies and measures.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 740 - Qual Impr, Inf Mgt, & Ld in HC
Credits: 3.00
This course emphasizes strategic planning and management, systems and organizational theories, quality improvement, and information management. It acquaints students with the process, tools and techniques of strategic planning that will enable them to manage patient populations and to contribute effectively to strategic thinking and action in health systems. The course focuses on leadership and the process of health care delivery from a systems perspective, emphasizing continuous process improvement as crucial to achieving high quality outcomes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 750 - Health Policy & Advocacy
Credits: 3.00
This course focuses on the leadership role of the DNP in influencing health policy makers and health policy development emphasizing interprofessional collaboration. The effect of nursing scholarship on health policy and advocacy will be explored. The regulatory and ethical environments that impact DNP practice are examined considering Ignatian values and social justice principles. Strategies for designing and leading the implementation of public, professional, and institutional polices relating to local, regional, national, and international health care and its delivery are considered.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 761 - Integr Appl of Evid Sem I
Credits: 2.00
This is the first of a series of four seminars that provide the DNP student with mentored opportunities to identify a practice issue and develop, implement, evaluate, and disseminate an independent, analytic, scholarly project focusing on problems of advanced nursing practice within specific populations. Each seminar course builds on the knowledge and practice expertise of the DNP student, culminating in the completion of a scholarly project. The range of projects will be varied as they relate to the DNP student's unique area of nursing, e.g., quality improvement, analyzing policy, designing and using databases, designing and evaluating new models of care, collaboration with researchers to answer clinical questions, program development, implementation, and evaluation. The student also examines the DNP role in relation to clinical scholarship and leadership.
Lecture: 2.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 701
Pre-requisites: NURS 700 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 762 - Integr Appl of Evid Sem II
Credits: 2.00
The DNP student refines the design of his or her scholarly project, including the data collection and evaluation plans. Students must successfully complete an oral defense of the planned project prior to beginning implementation.
Lecture: 2.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 702
Pre-requisites: NURS 701 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 761 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 763 - Integr Appl of Evid Sem III
Credits: 1.00
The DNP student continues to refine the evidence-based scholarly project specific to a population of interest within a practice setting.
Lecture: 1.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 703
Pre-requisites: NURS 702 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 762 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 764 - Integr Appl of Evid Sem IV
Credits: 1.00
In this final seminar course, the student will present the final defense of his or her scholarly project through an oral presentation that addresses the topic of interest, the development and implementation of the project, how it addressed the needs of a selected population, and an evaluation of the project and outcomes. Students will apply knowledge and skills obtained in the didactic and integrative courses to address the ethical, legal, financial and organizational aspects of the scholarly project.
Lecture: 1.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
Co-requisites: NURS 704
Pre-requisites: NURS 703 Minimum Grade: C and NURS 763 Minimum Grade: C
NURS 790 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Courses designed to address special topics in nursing, based on student and faculty interests.
Other: 1.00 to 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing
NURS 792 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Independent study requires completion of a form, and department permission and cannot be registered for via ZAGWEB. (Cannot be used to fulfill elective requirement).
Other: 1.00 to 4.00
College: School Nurs Human Physiology
Department: Nursing


Posted: December 12, 2017 ... A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | U | V | W



 Return to Catalog/Schedule Selection page
Release: 5.4.1
Powered by SCT