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Course Catalog - Academic Year 2017-2018

This is the course catalog for the current bulletin year. Click on a letter below to view the course subjects that begin with that letter.


Posted: December 12, 2017 ... A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | U | V | W


CATHOLIC STUDIES
CATH 190 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topic to be decided by faculty.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Catholic Studies
CATH 290 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topic to be decided by faculty.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Catholic Studies
CATH 390 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topic to be decided by faculty.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Catholic Studies
CATH 432 - CIS:
Credits: 3.00
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Catholic Studies
CATH 490 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topic to be decided by faculty.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Catholic Studies
CATH 499 - Catholic Studies Symposium
Credits: 3.00
A capstone course in which students will integrate their experiences in other Catholic Studies courses. Student will be responsible for writing a thesis under the direction or the instructor.
Other: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Catholic Studies
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
General Requirements: 15 credits
  Subj/Tst Low High Stdn Attr Req Crdt Min Crse Grd Con
RELI 220 3.00 0 Y
and 12.00 0 Y
CIVIL ENGINEERING
CENG 225 - Engineering Geology
Credits: 3.00
This course emphasizes physical geology, the study of Earth's evolution, morphology, its constituent minerals and rocks. Course topics include Earth processes that span a bewildering range of scales, and show why it is unwise to assume that everyday experiences are relevant. The foundation for the course is a quantitative perspective, beginning with Newton's laws of motion and gravity. Themes include the historical discovery of ideas, the interplay of 'gravity' and material behavior, and a model-deductive approach. The goal is enable student to appreciate the larger geological context of engineering and civil works projects, and the long-term forces which affect them.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Civil Engineering
CENG 226 - Hydrology & Watersheds
Credits: 3.00
Develop an understanding of the influence of geology, climate, weather, basin characteristics, and man's activities on watersheds and water. Uses satellite and surface data sources for making predictions of water availability and understanding current water concerns for western North America. Fall, each year.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: PHYS 103 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 261 - Introduction to Geomatics
Credits: 2.00
Basic principles of surveying data collection, analysis, and application. Measurement of elevations, distances and angles using total stations and global positioning systems. Examples of analysis of errors in measurements; application of surveying data to engineering design using GIS and 3-D models. Fall.
Lecture: 2.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Restrictions:
Co-requisites: CENG 261L
Pre-requisites: MATH 157 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 261L - Introduction to Geomatics Lab
Credits: 1.00
see CENG 261.
Lab: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Restrictions:
Co-requisites: CENG 261
CENG 301 - Structural Analysis I
Credits: 3.00
Theory and application of engineering mechanics to the solution of internal forces in statically determinate structures subjected to static and moving loads. Introduction of energy concepts for simple indeterminate structures. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: ENSC 301 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 302L - Construction Materials Lab
Credits: 1.00
Investigation of construction materials and applicable code specifications. Includes site visits to local construction material manufacturers and material testing labs. Materials studied include concrete, timber, brick, block, asphalt, aluminum and steel. Material testing and the technical writing of laboratory reports is stressed. Three hour laboratory per week. Fall.
Lab: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: ENSC 301 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 303 - Environmental Engineering
Credits: 3.00
An overview of the principles of environmental engineering. Topics include material balance, environmental chemistry, risk assessment, air quality, water quality, and water and wastewater treatment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CHEM 101 Minimum Grade: D or TRAN GCHM Minimum Grade: T or TRAN GCHM Minimum Grade: D
CENG 305 - Environmental Engineering Lab
Credits: 1.00
This course emphasizes fundamental environmental chemistry principles and analytical techniques used to study air and water quality and treatment process performance. The course also emphasizes statistical analysis, date interpretation, and reporting requirements associated with environmental engineering. CENG 303 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course.
Lecture: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 303 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 318 - Transportation Engineering
Credits: 3.00
The course will cover general knowledge in all the transportation fields including; traffic characteristics and flow theory. transportation planning. geometric design of highways, traffic safety, highway materials, and pavement design.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 261 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 331 - Soil Mechanics
Credits: 3.00
In this course the properties and behavior of soils (sand, gravel, silt and clay) are studied under various environmental conditions. The study includes weight-volume relations, soil classifications, soil compaction, seepage through porous media, normal effective stress concept, consolidation, shear strength, lateral pressures and slope stability. Laboratory and Field methods for evaluating pertinent properties, generally used for analysis and foundation design. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Co-requisites: CENG 331L
Pre-requisites: ENSC 301 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 331L - Soil Mechanics Lab
Credits: 1.00
Three hours of laboratory per week.
Lab: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
CENG 351 - Engineering Hydrology
Credits: 3.00
This course will form a foundation for the study of the occurrence, distribution, and movement of water on, in, and above the earth. Topics covered include: watersheds, precipitation, evaporation, infiltration, discharge calculations, hydrographs, river and reservoir routing, and drainage design including sanitary and storm sewer design and reservoir sizing. Statistical tools dealing with information in water resources, frequency analysis, confidence intervals for prediction, and risk. Applications to common engineering projects in surface and sub-surface situations are presented. Includes computer applications. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: ENSC 352 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 352 - Hydraulic Engineering
Credits: 3.00
Uses of fluid mechanics, engineering economic analysis and statistics in the engineering analysis and design of components of water resources systems. Flow of liquids in pipes and pipe networks. Design of hydro-machinery in water systems. Steady flow of water in open channels with immobile boundaries. Introduction to engineering hydrology. Reservoir sizing. Includes computer applications. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Co-requisites: CENG 352L
Pre-requisites: ENSC 352 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 352L - Hydraulic Engineer Lab
Credits: 1.00
see CENG 352.
Lab: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Co-requisites: CENG 352
CENG 390 - Structural Analysis II
Credits: 3.00
Theory and application of approximate analysis methods for statically indeterminate trusses and frames. Matrix methods of structural analysis for 2-D and 3-D structures.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 301 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 391 - Civil Eng Design & Practice
Credits: 3.00
An integration of topics essential to the practice of civil engineering, including: 1) engineering economics concepts; 2) project management approaches; 3) contract issues and project structures, and 4) general code of conduct of engineers and ethics. Engineering economy topics will include annual cost, present worth, future worth, and rate of return concepts. Students will develop an understanding of the elements of proposals, reports, construction drawings, and specifications. Engineering law, in the context of civil engineering project will be included to further illustrate the four main topics. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
CENG 404 - Sustainable Systems and Design
Credits: 3.00
This course explores the characteristics of sustainable systems and how design practices may encourage sustainability. Topics covered in the course will be selected for applicability to specific regions of the world and may change each year. Basic concepts include: building thermal performance, indoor and outdoor environmental quality, passive and active energy systems, water reclamation strategies, life cycle analysis and current sustainable building rating systems. Sustainable design concepts and methods are also applied to building design site development and infrastructure use.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
CENG 411 - Steel Design
Credits: 3.00
Application of basic principles of mechanics applied to the design of steel members. Design of structural members and connections using the current American Institute of Steel Construction specifications. Load and Resistance Factor Design and Allowable Stress Design procedures. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 301 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 412 - Concrete Design
Credits: 3.00
Theory and application of analytical procedures applied to the design of reinforced concrete structural members. Proportioning of beams, columns, footings, and walls in concrete structures is approached using current American Concrete Institute code specifications. Ultimate Strength Design Procedures. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 301 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 414 - Waste Management
Credits: 3.00
An overview of solid, hazardous, and industrial waste management. Topics include regulations, contaminant transport, waste sources, waste minimization, recycling, treatment and remediation technologies, landfill design and risk assessment.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 303 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 415 - Masonry - Timber Design
Credits: 3.00
Analysis and design of masonry and timber structures. Sizing of members in masonry and timber according to applicable building codes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 301 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 416 - Hydrogeology
Credits: 3.00
Fundamentals of hydrogeology: the hydrologic cycle; surface water and ground water interactions; principles of steady-state and transient flow groundwater flow; regional groundwater flow; finite difference solutions to groundwater flow equations. Application of MODFLOW and GIS to groundwater problems. Aquifer tests; ground water law and management; contaminant transport.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: ENSC 352 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 417 - Traffic Engineering
Credits: 3.00
Fundamentals of traffic engineering including traffic flow, capacity analysis, traffic signs and signals, and traffic engineering studies.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 261 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 418 - Transportation System Design
Credits: 3.00
Application of national and local standards to transportation system design situations from a multimodal perspective. Course emphasizes geometric design of roadway facilities but also incorporates design considerations for pedestrians, bicycles, and transit.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 318 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 420 - Structural Dynamics
Credits: 3.00
The analysis and response of structures to dynamic loads. Emphasis is given to dynamic loads due to earthquakes. Basic principles of the seismic design of structures. Prerequisites: CENG 301 and ENSC 306.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
CENG 424 - Physiochemical Treatment Proc
Credits: 3.00
The theory and design of physical and chemical treatment processes for water and wastewater. Topics include traditional wastewater treatment plant unit operations. Additional topics include sustainability, grey water, water reuse, developing countries, and remediation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 303 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 426 - Stream Restoration
Credits: 3.00
Course presents fundamentals of stream restoration: Hydrologic, sediment transport, geomorphic, and ecological principles applicable to (1) assessment of stream channel condition, (2) developing approaches to stream management and restoration, and (3) evaluating project performance. Approach emphasizes the inter-related nature of hydrology, hydraulics, sediment transport, geomorphology, fisheries, and aquatic and riparian ecology. Provides students opportunities to literally get their feet wet while making various observations and measurements in field exercises to evaluate physical and ecological stream characteristics assess stream stability.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 352 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 427 - Infrastructure Design
Credits: 3.00
Design and construction supervision of the infrastructure required for land development. Topics include roadway geometry, water supply pipelines, sewer pipelines, and storm water drainage. Students will prepare design drawings, project plans, project reports, project specifications, and construction cost estimates that address regulatory requirements.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 301 Minimum Grade: D and CENG 352 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 432 - Hazard Mitigation
Credits: 3.00
Quantitative Risk Analysis provides engineers with a basis to improve decisions for design and operation of complex projects by incorporating effects of uncertainty. Applications to a variety of engineering problems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
Pre-requisites: MATH 321 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 444 - Air Pollution
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the field of air pollution and its control. Topics include regulations, air pollution sources, health effects, meteorology, and the theory and design of control techniques.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 303 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 450 - Geospatial Data Applications
Credits: 3.00
This course will introduce the collection, management and application of geospatial data in engineering. Geospatial data is extremely important with increasing reliance on geographic information systems (GIS) in the interpretation and use of remotely sensed data sets. The course will use examples from a variety of fields including: water resources, hydrology, geology, geography, planning, and transportation. Students will complete projects in topical issues selected each year.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 303 Minimum Grade: D and CENG 352 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 454 - Biological Treatment Processes
Credits: 3.00
The theory and design of biological processes for water and wastewater treatment. Topics include basic microbiology, activated sludge, membrane bioreactors, bioremediation, as well as biological treatment systems for water reuse, small on-site treatment systems, and air pollution.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 303 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 463 - Pavement Design
Credits: 3.00
Loads on pavements, stresses in pavements, vehicle and traffic consideration, climate, environmental effects. Soils and materials characterization.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 331 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 473 - Foundation Design
Credits: 3.00
General principles behind foundation design. Shallow and deep foundation design: spread footings and pile foundation. Retaining structures: sheet-pile walls, bulkheads and cofferdams.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
Pre-requisites: CENG 331 Minimum Grade: D
CENG 900 - Civil Engineering Workshop
Credits: .00 to 9.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Civil Engineering
CHEMISTRY
CHEM 101 - General Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
A systematic treatment of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry and their applications. Designed for science and engineering majors. Taken concurrently with CHEM 101L. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 101L
CHEM 101L - General Chemistry Lab
Credits: 1.00
Taken concurrently with CHEM 101. One laboratory per week. Fall and Spring.
Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 101
CHEM 104 - Scientific Inquiry
Credits: 2.00
This lecture and lab course content will be determined by the instructor to meet the learning objectives of the Scientific Inquiry requirement of the University Core. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Restrictions:
Co-requisites: CHEM 104L
CHEM 104L - Science Inquiry Lab
Credits: 1.00
Taken concurrently with CHEM 104. Fall and Spring.
Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 104
CHEM 111 - Chemistry in Context
Credits: 3.00
A survey of chemical topics related to contemporary social issues. Specifically designed for non-science majors. CHEM 111L optional. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
CHEM 111L - Chemistry in Context Lab
Credits: 1.00
See CHEM 111 for description. Taken concurrently with CHEM 111.
Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Colleges:
School of Engineering/Appl Sci
May not be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Biology
Chemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 111
CHEM 123 - Environmental Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
This course will cover the fundamental principles of chemistry necessary to understand the source, transport, and fate of substances in the environment due to human activity. Additional topics will be chosen by the instructor but may include the environmental implications of various energy-generation methods; the chemistry of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere; climate change; and water quality, pollution, and treatment of water sources. Taken concurrently with CHEM 123L. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 123L
CHEM 123L - Environmental Chemistry Lab
Credits: 1.00
See CHEM 123 course description. Taken concurrently with CHEM 123. Spring.
Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 123
CHEM 190 - Study Abroad Special Topics
Credits: .00 to 6.00
Topic to be decided by faculty.
Lecture: .00 to 6.00 Other: .00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
CHEM 193 - FYS:
Credits: 3.00
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Restrictions:
CHEM 198 - Topics in Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
This lecture only course is designed for non-science majors. Different subfields of chemistry will be explored depending on the instructor. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
CHEM 205 - Inorganic Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to foundational concepts in inorganic chemistry with emphasis on atomic structure, bonding, and reactivity. Topics will include nuclear chemistry, quantum mechanics, periodic trends, covalent bonding, ionic bonding, metallic bonding, coordinate covalent bonding, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, and thermodynamics. Three lectures per week. Fall annually.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 101 Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 230 - Organic Chemistry
Credits: 4.00
Essential concepts in bonding and structure, acid-base chemistry, reactivity and synthesis of functional groups, nomenclature, and mechanisms of fundamental organic reactions. Three lectures and one recitation per week. Taken concurrently with CHEM 230L. Spring.
Lecture: 4.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Restrictions:
Co-requisites: CHEM 230L
Pre-requisites: CHEM 101 Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 230L - Organic Chemistry Lab I
Credits: 1.00
Preparation and analysis of representative organic compounds. One laboratory per week. Taken concurrently with CHEM 230. Spring.
Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 230
Pre-requisites: CHEM 101L Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 231 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.00
Continuation of CHEM 230. A significant focus of the course will be on aromatic compounds and carbonyl chemistry. Other topics include organometallic chemistry, radicals, mass spectrometry and synthetic polymers. Three lectures per week. Fall annually.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 231L
Pre-requisites: CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 231L - Organic Chemistry II Lab
Credits: 1.00
Preparation and analysis of representative organic compounds. One laboratory per week. Fall.
Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 231
Pre-requisites: CHEM 230L Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 245 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.00
Structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids). Fundamental concepts of protein structure and function, kinetics and enzymology, bioenergetics and thermodynamics, metabolism and regulation, will be discussed. Three lectures per week. Fall and Spring. Begins 2018.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 245L
Pre-requisites: CHEM 231 Minimum Grade: D or CHEM 331 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 245L - Biochemistry Lab
Credits: 1.00
Laboratory methods and techniques relevant to biochemistry. One laboratory per week. Fall and Spring. Begins 2018.
Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 245
Pre-requisites: CHEM 231L Minimum Grade: D or CHEM 331L Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 270 - Career Development I
Credits: 1.00
This course will introduce chemistry and biochemistry majors to research and career opportunities related to their major, the use of primary literature, and scientific ethics. One lecture per week. Restricted to chemistry and biochemistry majors. Spring annually.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Biochemistry
Chemistry
CHEM 295 - Science Outreach
Credits: .00
The Biology and Chemistry departments run a variety of outreach programs that include class visits, field trip tours, special summer programs and more. All of our programs strive to engage participants with opportunities for hands-on scientific discovery and inspiration.
Lecture: .00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
CHEM 304 - Practice in Lab Teaching
Credits: .00 or 1.00
Introduction to the methods of laboratory teaching. Emphasis on safety, time management, direct student-teacher interaction, and class presentation.
Other: .00 or 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 230 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 310 - Analytical Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
Principles of foundational analytical techniques and methods are presented in three lectures per week. These include gravimetric, volumetric, electrochemical, spectrometric, chromatographic, and mass spectrometry topics as well as basic descriptive statistics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 310L
Pre-requisites: CHEM 231 Minimum Grade: C- or CHEM 331 Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 310L - Analytical Chemistry Lab
Credits: 2.00
Laboratory experiments including titrations, gravimetric analysis, molecular and atomic spectroscopy, potentiometry, and chromatography. Sample preparation, instrument calibration, data analysis, and reporting are emphasized. Two laboratory periods per week.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 310
Pre-requisites: CHEM 231L Minimum Grade: C- or CHEM 331L Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 320 - Physical Chemistry I
Credits: 3.00
Quantum mechanics, group theory, and spectroscopy. Three lectures per week. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: MATH 258 Minimum Grade: D and ( PHYS 103 Minimum Grade: D or PHYS 101 Minimum Grade: D ) and CHEM 310 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 321 - Physical Chemistry II
Credits: 3.00
Thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and kinetics. Three lectures per week. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 310 Minimum Grade: C- and MATH 258 Minimum Grade: D and ( PHYS 103 Minimum Grade: D or PHYS 101 Minimum Grade: D )
CHEM 341 - Unified Laboratory II
Credits: 2.00
Laboratory experiments emphasizing physical chemistry methods. Two laboratories per week. Spring.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 310L Minimum Grade: D and CHEM 320 Minimum Grade: D and CHEM 331L Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 345L - Advanced Biochemistry Lab
Credits: 3.00
In-depth exploration of concepts and techniques used to study biomolecules and biomolecular systems with additional emphasis on scientific writing and communication in biochemistry. Fulfills one Writing-Enriched (WE) designation in the University Core. Two laboratories per week. Fall and Spring. Beginning 2019.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 245 Minimum Grade: D and CHEM 245L Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 355 - Physical Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to foundational concepts in physical chemistry with emphasis on quantum mechanics, gases, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Three lectures per week. Fall. Beginning 2018.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 355L
Pre-requisites: CHEM 310 Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 205 Minimum Grade: D and PHYS 204 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 355L - Physical/Inorganic Chem Lab
Credits: 1.00
Experiments that emphasize synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds, as well as physical chemistry methods ranging from spectroscopy to thermodynamics and kinetics. One laboratory period per week. Fall. Beginning 2018.
Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Co-requisites: CHEM 355
Pre-requisites: CHEM 310L Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 205 Minimum Grade: D and PHYS 204 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 370 - Career Development II
Credits: 1.00
This course will focus on scientific oral presentations and scientific writing and will prepare the students for their senior project. This course will also include outside speakers from graduate schools and the chemistry and biochemistry industry to further provide educational opportunities about continued study and employment in the field. One lecture per week. Spring. Beginning 2019.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Biochemistry
Chemistry
CHEM 385L - Advanced Chemistry Lab
Credits: 3.00
In-depth laboratory course featuring projects, often interdisciplinary, within the analytical, inorganic, physical, and organic sub-disciplines of chemistry. Literature engagement and scientific writing are emphasized. Two laboratory periods per week. Spring. Beginning 2019.
Lab: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 355 Minimum Grade: C- and CHEM 355L Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 390 - Directed Research
Credits: .00 to 3.00
Topic to be decided by faculty.
Other: .00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
CHEM 395 - Research Assistantship
Credits: .00
Undergraduate research assistantships are opportunities for student to earn a stipend while performing independent research in the laboratory of a Biology or Chemistry & Biochemistry faculty member.
Lecture: .00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
CHEM 399 - Advanced Topics:
Credits: 2.00
CHEM 399 courses will focus on reading the primary literature in a particular content area, and will emphasize in-class discussion, writing, and/or presentations. Topics will vary. Two lectures per week. Fall and Spring. Prerequisites vary depending on topic. Beginning 2018.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
CHEM 405 - Special Topic in Chem/Biochem
Credits: 2.00
Special topics in chemistry or biochemistry. Two lectures per week. Fall and Spring. Pre-requisites vary depending on topic. Beginning 2018.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
CHEM 406 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
Application of quantum mechanics, group theory, and molecular orbital theory to inorganic compounds including transition metal complexes. Special topics include recent advances in inorganic chemistry. Two lectures per week. Spring, even years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 320 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 432 - CIS:
Credits: 3.00
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
CHEM 443L - Biochemistry Laboratory I
Credits: 2.00
An investigation of the techniques used to examine biomolecules and biological systems. Integrated laboratory experiments in biochemistry. Two laboratories per week. Spring.
Lab: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 440 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 440 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 445 - Biochemistry II
Credits: 3.00
Continuation of CHEM 440, including an examination of the primary processes of cellular energy production, oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis. The major metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides are covered. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: ( CHEM 440 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 440 Minimum Grade: D )
CHEM 450 - Biophysical Chemistry
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, kinetics and physical methods as they relate to the study of biological macromolecules. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: MATH 157 Minimum Grade: D and ( CHEM 440 Minimum Grade: D or BIOL 440 Minimum Grade: D )
CHEM 455 - Special Topic in Chem/Biochem
Credits: 2.00
Special topics in chemistry or biochemistry. Fall and Spring. Prerequisite CHEM 355 Foundational Physical Chemistry. Additional pre-requisites may be required depending on topic. Beginning 2019.
Lecture: 2.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 355 Minimum Grade: C-
CHEM 471 - Chemical Bibliography
Credits: 1.00
Survey of the chemical literature as background for the senior thesis or senior literature review. Presentation, both written and oral, of scientific material will be emphasized. Spring.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
CHEM 485 - Seminar I
Credits: 1.00
Required of all fourth year chemistry majors. Fall.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
CHEM 486 - Seminar II
Credits: 1.00
Required of all fourth year chemistry majors. Continuation of CHEM 485. Spring.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Pre-requisites: CHEM 485 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 488 - Senior Literature Review
Credits: 1.00
Literature review of special chemical problem or topic under the direction of a faculty member.
Other: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
Pre-requisites: CHEM 471 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 490 - Directed Reading
Credits: .00 to 3.00
Material and credit to be arranged.
Other: .00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
CHEM 497 - Internship
Credits: .00 to 6.00
Professional work experience in a chemistry-related field.
Other: .00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Chemistry
CHEM 498A - Thesis
Credits: 1.00
Investigation of special chemical problems and topics under the direction of a faculty member. Required of all B.S. majors. Fall.
Other: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
Pre-requisites: CHEM 471 Minimum Grade: D
CHEM 498B - Thesis
Credits: 1.00
Required of all B.S. majors. Continuation of CHEM 498A. Spring.
Other: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
Pre-requisites: CHEM 498A Minimum Grade: D
CHINESE
CHIN 201 - Intermediate Chinese I
Credits: 4.00
Review and further training in the fundamentals of grammar and syntax. In addition to work in oral Chinese, there are progressive exercises in reading and writing longer discourse. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Modern Languages & Literature
General Requirements:
  Subj/Tst Low High Stdn Attr Req Crdt Min Crse Grd Con
( CHIN 102 0.00 0 N
) or ( ASCH 04 0.00 0 N
)
CHIN 202 - Intermediate Chinese II
Credits: 4.00
A continuation of CHIN 201. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Modern Languages & Literature
General Requirements:
  Subj/Tst Low High Stdn Attr Req Crdt Min Crse Grd Con
( CHIN 201 0.00 0 N
) or ( ASCH 05 0.00 0 N
)
CHIN 290 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Topic to be decided by faculty.
Other: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Modern Languages & Literature
CHIN 303 - Conversation and Composition
Credits: 3.00
Students will engage in communicative tasks to improve oral production, fluency and accuracy, and in order to develop communicative strategies. This class will also require students to increase the accuracy, fluency and complexity of their written Chinese.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Modern Languages & Literature
Pre-requisites: CHIN 302 Minimum Grade: D
CLASSICS
CLAS 110 - Intro to the Ancient World
Credits: 3.00
An introductory survey to the origins of Western civilization in the Mediterranean world, with particular focus on the Classical cultures of Greece and Rome. The course will focus upon an exploration of these ancient societies, their origins and structure, their social and political constructs, and their neighbors and worldviews. Particular emphasis will be placed upon examining the enduring legacies produced by these ancient peoples and their continuing influence upon the concepts and ideals valued by our contemporary Western culture.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 193 - FYS:
Credits: 3.00
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
Restrictions:
CLAS 220 - Intro to Classical Literature
Credits: 3.00
This course is a survey of the literature of the ancient Greeks and Romans. It introduces students to the important authors of Classical Antiquity, the critical issues surrounding their work, and their lasting influence. It stresses the role that ancient authors had in shaping our understanding of literature: its genres, methods, and subject matter. Fulfills 200-level ENGL literature requirement. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 310 - Greek Gods & Heroes
Credits: 3.00
A study of Greek Mythology that uses texts (in translation), architecture and archaeology to explore the most important characters and stories of Greek mythology that have become part of the art, literature and imagination of western civilization. This course gives students insight into approaches toward the understanding of myth, especially classical myth that are helpful for their own studies and interests. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 320 - The Iliad & the Odyssey
Credits: 3.00
This course explores (in translation) Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, two poems that are among the foundations of the literature of Western Civilization. Students will demonstrate an ability to read and analyze these two great epics of ancient Greece in a way that appreciates and unlocks their timeless beauty, depth and significance especially in a way that is helpful for their own studies and interests. Spring, alternate years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 330 - Women in Antiquity
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the representation of women Greece and Rome through image and text, using a variety of literary, art historical, and archaeological sources. This course is intended both to illuminate the lives of women in Classical Antiquity and to demonstrate how this illumination is important for a full understanding of the societies of Greece (in particular, Athens) and Rome. Students also gain valuable experience in thinking critically about sources, both ancient and modern. Fall, alternate years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 340 - Roman Epic
Credits: 3.00
This course explores (in translation) two of Rome's great contributions to world literature: Vergil's Aeneid and Lucan's Civil War. These works are at the core of the western tradition. They have been read and reinterpreted for millennia and continue to find resonance today. Students learn to read and analyze these poems closely, to appreciate them, and to unlock their timeless beauty, depth and significance. Special attention is paid to applying the themes of these works to student's own lives and studies. Fall, alternate years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 350 - Love Poetry in Antiquity
Credits: 3.00
Is love a modern invention? This course looks at the phenomenon of love as it appears in the poetry of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Works read (in translation) will include those of Sappho, Callimachus, Catullus Ovid and others. Students will investigate ancient attitudes towards love, sex, and gender roles while developing an appreciation for the differences between time periods, authors, style, and genre. Students will also explore the long-lasting influence of this poetry and find ways to apply it to their own studies and interests.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 360 - Ancient N. Eastern Archaeology
Credits: 3.00
Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology will introduce the student to the archaeology of Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Levant. Archaeological methodology, the history of excavation of ancient sites and material culture will be examined as well as ancient languages, literature and history.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 370 - Peoples and Empires of Turkey
Credits: 3.00
This course will provide students with a comprehensive survey of major historical and cultural developments associated with ancient civilizations in Turkey. Using primary textual and archaeological sources, course content will focus upon investigating key trends and cultural movements originating in early societies and ancient empires, from the advent of our earliest known human settlements to the impact of the imperial domination within the Mediterranean basin. Offered as Study Abroad/Summer Course only.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
Pre-requisites: HIST 101 Minimum Grade: D
CLAS 375 - Topics in Classic Civilization
Credits: 3.00
A course offering the student an opportunity to study literature of the Classical world in translation. Offered annually.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 410 - Topics in Greek Civilization
Credits: 3.00
A course offering the student an opportunity to study aspects of classical civilization, with a specialized focus on aspects of the Greek world and its culture. Offered annually.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 420 - Topics in Roman Civilization
Credits: 3.00
A course offering the student an opportunity to study aspects of classical civilization, with a specialized focus on aspects of the Roman world and its culture. Offered annually.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 432 - CIS:
Credits: 3.00
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 490 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Directed Study requires completion of a form and Dept. permission, and cannot be registered for via Zagweb.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 491 - Independent Study
Credits: .00 to 7.00
Other: .00 to 7.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 497 - Internship
Credits: .00 to 6.00
Professional work experience related to classical civilizations.
Other: .00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
CLAS 499 - Senior Thesis
Credits: 3.00
The senior thesis is required for majors in Classical Civilizations in their fourth year. Offered annually in the Fall semester.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Classical Civilizations
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Classical Civilization
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
COMMUNICATION LEADERSHIP
COML 500 - Organizational Leadership
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to organizational leadership begins with an examination of these questions: How do leaders explain the causes of dysfunctional thinking and/or behavior in themselves, other leaders, or in organizations? How do they understand the differences among a variety of styles of leadership and organizational models? How do they apply the theories of leadership and the principles of organizational behavior to actual situations? How do they formulate a broad, integrative perspective from which to view leadership and organizational behavior? Drawing from the social science, this integrated course focuses on research and models of leadership relevant to defining and achieving collective goals in a variety of organizational settings.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 501 - Comm and Org Research
Credits: 3.00
Students will learn and develop competencies in the knowledge and skills necessary to understand and/or engage in primary research. Students will learn: how to identify, select, and review academic studies relevant to a research topic; how to generate research questions by refining and distilling a research topic; and how to develop a methodological design that identifies and explains the research method to answer research questions. For students in the COML program, this course serves as a critical building block for the capstone COML 680 Thesis/Project course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 503 - Comm & Organizational Ethics
Credits: 3.00
This course will examine ethical dilemmas of communication and leadership within the context of moral choices and implications of decision-making. Course readings and case study analysis will prepare students to function ethically in personal, social, political, and professional spheres. Defining and analyzing personal values and worldviews in online postings will help students identify and clarify personal motivations, behaviors, and reactions to ethical problems. Students will integrate and apply ethical principles to logically identify, develop, and evaluate solutions to real-word ethical problems.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 504 - Organizational Communication
Credits: 3.00
All organizations - from Microsoft, to churches, to social clubs, and universities — rely on communication. Being able to communicate strategically is crucial to meaningful participation. This course will explore contemporary concepts about the meanings and functions of communication in organizations. Organizational communication encompasses not only communication within businesses, but also within large private or nonprofit associations, larger community groups, and governments both large and small. We will cover selected topics in organizational communication research such as culture, socialization, systems theory, communication and technology, and globalization.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 505 - Digital Storytelling
Credits: 3.00
The digital age has changed the way we tell stories. Web 2.0 technologies allow users access to a range of digital technologies to not only create their own stories, but share them widely through social media. But how do stories make an impact on audiences, given that there is so much more information available? This course teaches students different forms of storytelling using digital media tools including Audacity, GIMP, imovie, and Windows MovieMaker. Readings help students better understand different narrative and persuasive styles of storytelling as well as understand the major theoretical and policy-related issues. Through hands-on assignments, students will acquire technical skills that will help them become more effective communicators in the digital age.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 506 - Intnl & Intcultural Comm
Credits: 3.00
Who we are - whether we are comfortable with this idea or not - is shaped in part by the social roles we occupy and how society sees us in those roles. As we will see from the very beginning of this class, our social roles, the class we are born into, and our gender all have implications for our lives. We will explore intercultural communication as a tool for bridging differences and learning about identities, practices, and cultures.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 507 - Emerging Leadership
Credits: 3.00
Other: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 508 - Theorizing Communication
Credits: 3.00
As an introduction to the field of communication, this course investigates major theories of communication, emphasizing theorizing as a process of constructing visions of reality. Critical analysis of the underlying assumptions of theoretical models of communication will help to frame your understanding of communication into a philosophical and ethical statement.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
Co-requisites: COML 518
COML 509 - Social Dynamics of Comm & Tech
Credits: 3.00
This course will explore, examine, and analyze the ways in which communication technology influences our shared fundamental assumptions about the nature of communication, and the manner in which we interact with one another on a daily basis, as well as our socially shared values, beliefs, and attitudes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 510 - CommunicationTeaching&Pedagogy
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed for people considering a career as a communication educator at the college level. The goals for this class have three interrelated dimensions; (a) cognitive learning, (b) affective orientation; and (c) behavioral development. Students will develop curriculum, learn teaching strategies, develop goals and assessment, observe college classroom environments, and build a teaching portfolio.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 511 - Sem in Comm Consulting & Train
Credits: 3.00
In a global economy, it is increasingly important to have the training and consulting skills that will allow you to interact effectively with many different cultures. Understanding and creating new media programs is vital to you and your organization’s success. This course will explore the unique application of communication skills and models for training and consulting. There will be practice in consulting in a variety of settings, developing resources, marketing, workshop development, training, skill building, and evaluation.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 512 - Sem in Strategic & Corporate
Credits: 3.00
Gone are the days when organizations can afford to just wait it out while their competition moves ahead. Whether a student leads or works for an organization, or is in charge of strategic planning or communication, it is critical to understand how to develop, implement and evaluate effective integrated communication plans. New ideas, trends, issues, projects, and services in our workplaces are all opportunities to plan, strategize and communicate with the many stakeholders. Students learn from real- life examples as well as their colleagues to fully understand and implement campaigns, media relations strategies, and social media tactics.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 513 - Sem in Adv Topics in Comm
Credits: 3.00
This seminar explores cutting-edge technologies, theory, and issues. The specific theme of this course varies each time it is offered because communication is constantly evolving.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 514 - Sem in Advanced Criticism
Credits: 3.00
The study of criticism begins with the understanding that as human beings we use language and other symbols to shape the world in which we live. Rhetorical theory allows us to begin to understand how symbols function. Rhetorical criticism is one of the processes through which we assess specific symbolic acts. Students will explore and apply several different methods including how to describe primary rhetorical acts or texts (including speeches, films, news coverage, television programs, songs, and advertisements, among others) in rich, relevant detail, how to situate or make sense of rhetorical acts or texts within their historical, cultural moments; and how to use theory to develop a rhetorical perspective that will help render a judgment about a text or act.
Other: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 515 - Sem in Interpersonal & Sm Grp
Credits: 3.00
This course will enhance your ability to assess an interpersonal or small-group communication event and its context (a “context” can be familial, business, church, school-related, and so on). Students will learn to choose among relevant theoretical perspectives in order to understand and improve interpersonal and small-group communication within specific social contexts. The course is designed to encourage students to explore the communication dynamics that create group situations (and the ethical dimensions of these situations), and to explore specific communication actions that can lead to positive social change.
Other: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 516 - Seminar in Media Literacy
Credits: 3.00
Despite our awareness that we live in an age of communication, we are often unaware of how we contribute, define, make, use and are used by various forms of communication media. Communication in our society takes place in many forms, including mass electronic media, telecommunications, transportation, publishing and even our educational system. This course examines the implications of several forms of communication for how we live and what we believe, including the impact of mass media on modern societies, conflicting social interests and the needs of different groups in society, the formation of public opinion, and the diffusion of innovations. Attention will be directed throughout the course to the processes of developing action plans for communication that incorporates principles of media literacy.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 517 - Communication Practicum
Credits: 3.00
This course is grounded in the principle that the best learning is experiential, and occurs in the context of a community. This practicum is designed to merge theory and praxis, providing practical application of communication knowledge and action with a focus on public speaking, group processes writing, and multi-media products. Students will work to create a website/blog of a community profile that includes speaking, writing, and multi-media components.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 520 - Comm Leadership Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Students will complete an approximately 240-hour internship under the supervision of a communication professor at a local college or university for one semester or quarter. The internship includes the development of a portfolio and evaluations from internship supervisors. Students are responsible for arranging the internship.
Other: 1.00 to 6.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 521 - Travel Writing
Credits: 3.00
This course is designed to improve your ability to write a narrative from stories about travel. The genre ranges from the documentary to the evocative, from literary to journalistic, and from humorous to serious. This course will show you how to put your camera aside (temporarily) and engage your experiences more deeply in both strange and familiar places close to home. Text exercises will help you develop the basic storytelling and descriptive skills this genre requires. Selected current readings will serve as examples of good writing.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 522 - Ren Rhetoric & Contemp Ldrshp
Credits: 3.00
This course examines rhetoric, written, oral, and visual to understand the humanistic movement of the Italian Renaissance and the role it continues to play in contemporary leadership. Through readings, discussions, and on-site visits to historical settings in Rome, Florence and Siena, we will formulate and explore the critical questions necessary to bring these ideas to our contemporary world. This course will be offered every summer.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 523 - Peacebuilding in N. Ireland
Credits: 3.00
Dialogue requires responsiveness that is made possible by qualities of thought and talk allowing transformation to take place: transformation in how people understand the self, the other, and the societies they inhabit. The course will reflect on the causes and history of The Troubles (1969-1998) as well as the tortuous peace; process following the Belfast Agreement in 1998. Local peacebuilding through dialogue is central to understanding how peace has been maintained.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 530 - Women, Comm, & Ldrshp
Credits: 3.00
This course will look at gender differences in leadership styles and efficacy as well as specific communication issues women face in attaining and retaining leadership positions. Through readings, discussions, videos, and projects that critically examine images and gender stereotypes of women leaders, the course is designed to give students practical skills they can use to be better communicators and leaders.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 595 - Theorizing Communication
Credits: 3.00
As an introduction to the field of communication, this course investigates major theories of communication, emphasizing theorizing as a process of constructing visions of reality. Critical analysis of the underlying assumptions of theoretical models of communication will help to frame your understanding of communication into a philosophical and ethical statement.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 596 - Master's Level Writing
Credits: .00
This course is a resource for graduate students who are apprehensive about their writing skills or who need to brush up on writing competencies. It is designed to both assess a student's writing skills and improve them if need be. It is also designed to introduce graduate students to the genre of academic writing in the discipline of communication.
Lecture: .00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 597 - Communication Ethics
Credits: 3.00
Inquiry into the philosophic foundations of interpersonal relations and values in multiple contexts with emphasis on applications of ethical systems to the responsibilities of people in organizations toward society and individuals.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 598 - International & Intercultural
Credits: 3.00
Identification and analysis of processes and problems of communication as affected by differences in culture and identity. It explores effects of differences in attitudes, social organization, role expectations, language and nonverbal behavior, all of which are interrelated. Principles of communication theory as they apply to the intercultural context are also emphasized.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 599 - Communication Practicum
Credits: 3.00
This residential practicum is designed to merge theory and praxis and provide practical application of communication knowledge and action with a focus on public speaking, group processes, writing, and multi--‐media products.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 600 - Multi-Media Practicum
Credits: 3.00
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 601 - Applied Communication Research
Credits: 3.00
Through engagement with primary research and exposure to current methodologies and the inquiry process, this course requires the development of a research proposal (e.g. literature review, rationale for the proposed questions, formal research questions and/or hypotheses, and proposed method description.) The course is designed to be paired with the capstone course so that the work defined in the proposal can be completed in the capstone course.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 602 - Comm & Ldrshp Capstone Seminar
Credits: 3.00
Candidates for the master's degree in communication and leadership will complete a modified thesis or project under the guidance of a professor and/or mentor. The student will complete an original research study or applied project. The completed and accepted thesis/project will be presented in a public forum. Prerequisite: COML 601 and 24 graduate credits.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 611 - Seminar Continuation
Credits: 1.00
Other: 1.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COML 680 - Comm & Ldrshp Seminar/Thesis
Credits: 3.00
In this integrative capstone course students will complete a thesis or project on a communication topic. Under the guidance of a professor and a mentor, the student will complete an original research study or applied project to be presented in a public forum.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
General Requirements: 32.01 credits
  Subj/Tst Low High Stdn Attr Req Crdt Min Crse Grd Con
( COML 501 0.00 1 N
) or ( ORGL 501 0.00 1 N
) and (
Rule 30 CRD:
30.00 0 Y
End of rule 30 CRD
)
COML 690 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Arranged with faculty.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Professional Studies
Department: Communication & Ldrshp Studies
COMMUNICATION
COMM 100 - Communication and Speech
Credits: 3.00
In this course, students will be introduced to and cultivate an understanding of interpersonal and small-group communication. The course also requires application of critical thinking, reasoning and research skills necessary to organize, write and present several speeches. Students will learn effective active communication and listening skills necessary to the development of the individual, the university and the greater public communities.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
COMM 184 - Comm, Culture, & Society
Credits: 3.00
Foundation course for the major that examines the philosophical, psychological, economic, and technological forces that have shaped communication innovations and practices. Subjects covered include dialogue, the news industry, advertising, propaganda, semiotics, popular culture, modernity, and myth. Required first course for all Communication Studies majors. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
COMM 193 - FYS:
Credits: 3.00
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Restrictions:
COMM 234 - Nonverbal Communication
Credits: 3.00
Comprehensive study of the role of nonverbal communication in interpersonal relationships. Multi-disciplinary research and practical exercises are used to probe the nature and primacy of nonverbal communication in social and organizational settings. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 244 - Interpersonal & Small Group
Credits: 3.00
Study of interpersonal and small group communication styles and behaviors based on research findings; students will also develop their skills through the practical application of theory. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 254 - Popular Culture
Credits: 3.00
Examination of various facets of popular culture, such as advertisements, clothing, toys and games, and examples from online, print, film, and television media. The course covers the development of cultural studies and critical methods of analysis. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 264 - History of Rhetoric
Credits: 3.00
This course covers the development and systematization of persuasive argument from the classical era to the present. The course develops analytical and expressive powers while promoting an appreciation and understanding of persuasive techniques. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101
COMM 270H - Honors Rhetoric
Credits: 3.00
The principles and psychology of persuasive argument and interpersonal skills. Through theory and practice students will develop and refine their communication skills while developing an individual style. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: HONS 190 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 280 - Communication Theory
Credits: 3.00
This course examines various "ways of knowing" about communication through the review and criticism of the major theories that explain communication processes and effects. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 321 - Advanced Public Speaking
Credits: 3.00
A rigorous examination of the various forms of public address. Students will hone their skills through a variety of classroom presentations. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: ( COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D ) and ( COMM 100 Minimum Grade: D or SPCO 101 Minimum Grade: D )
COMM 331 - Argumentation and Debate
Credits: 3.00
Examination of the fundamentals of advocacy including argumentation theory, techniques of persuasion, refutation, and cross-examination. This course is open to both debate team members and anyone interested in improving their argumentation skills. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 342 - Debate Participation
Credits: 1.00
Participation on University debate teams.
Lecture: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
COMM 362 - Persuasion
Credits: 3.00
Theory and practice of effective persuasive techniques. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 380 - Communication Research Methods
Credits: 3.00
This course surveys qualitative and quantitative methodologies used to examine human communication and other cultural phenomena. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: ( COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D ) and COMM 280 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 381 - Ethnography
Credits: 3.00
Ethnography is a research methodology (based on observation and writing) used to interpret and understand human communication. Methods used in the course include participant observations, field studies, interviews, focus groups and archival research. The course promotes the appreciation of the humanistic and aesthetic aspects of a culture while practicing scientific modes of inquiry. This is a social justice course, thus research projects are designed to give voice to marginalized sub-cultures and communities. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 384 - Media, Technology, & Society
Credits: 3.00
This course uses communication theory and history to examine the complex relationship between society and technology, which is not merely straightforward innovation, but involves a complex set of practices, norms and values. The course explores the reciprocity between (old and new) technologies and gender, culture, economics, politics, privacy and self-identity. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 401 - Communication & Leadership
Credits: 3.00
A critical examination of the reciprocity between effective communication and successful leadership. Includes an historical examination of leadership styles, theories, and research. Includes an analysis of motivation, power, and organizational culture. Writing and speaking assignments are designed to cultivate leadership skills. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 418 - Intercultural & Intern'l Comm
Credits: 3.00
An analysis of communication problems and differences owing to national and cultural differences. Covers the interrelatedness and effects of differences in attitudes, social organization, role expectations, language and non-verbal behavior. Fundamental tenets of communication theory will be applied to intercultural contexts. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Freshman
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 432 - CIS:
Credits: 3.00
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
COMM 464 - Rhetorical Criticism
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to the methods and theories of rhetorical criticism. Classical and contemporary approaches are applied to speeches, books, films, television programs, and musical productions. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 475 - Organizational Communication
Credits: 3.00
Study of research findings, theories, and models of communication in organizations; examination of the effects of organizational culture and structure on clear communication. The course covers practical ways to overcome communication obstacles and how to communicate effectively within organizations. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 480 - Themes in Communcatn Studies
Credits: 3.00
The specific theme of the course varies each semester but may include topics such as media effects, semiotics, dialogue, visual communication, the philosophy of language, virtual realities, and technology and the Self. Offered on sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 482 - Seminar
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Special topics with credit to be arranged. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 484 - Senior Seminar
Credits: 3.00
In this capstone course for the major, students demonstrate their proficiency in oral, written, and visual communication by adapting their senior thesis to multiple communication platforms. The seminar is also designed to help students reflect on their education and develop a personal philosophy of communication. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
Pre-requisites: COMM 184 Minimum Grade: D or COMM 101 Minimum Grade: D
COMM 490 - Dir Study in Communication
Credits: .00 to 10.00
Special projects and readings, credit by arrangement with the instructor. Requires completion of an Individualized Study form and Department permission. Registration is through the Registrar’s Office rather than Zagweb. Offered on sufficient demand.
Other: .00 to 10.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
COMM 497 - Internship
Credits: .00 to 6.00
Professional experience in a communication related fields. Students must take the initiative to contact an agency or business and find a Communication Studies department faculty member willing to supervise the internship. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Other: .00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Communication Studies
COMPUTER ENGINEERING
CPEN 230 - Intro Digital Logic
Credits: 3.00
Number systems and codes, Boolean Algebra, Logic gates and flip-flops. Verilog HDL. Combinational and sequential Logic Design using CPLDs. Three lecture hours per week.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Engineering
Co-requisites: CPEN 230L
CPEN 230L - Intro Digital Logic Lab
Credits: 1.00
Three laboratory hours per week. Taken concurrently with CPEN 230.
Lab: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Engineering
Co-requisites: CPEN 230
CPEN 231 - Microcomputer Arch & Assm Prog
Credits: 3.00
Study of components of simple computer systems: CPU's memory, registers, busses, computer control, microprogramming, assembly language programming. Three lecture hours per week.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Engineering
Co-requisites: CPEN 231L
Pre-requisites: CPSC 121 Minimum Grade: D
CPEN 231L - Microcomp Arch & Assm Prog Lab
Credits: 1.00
Three laboratory hours per week. Taken concurrently with CPEN 231.
Lab: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Engineering
Co-requisites: CPEN 231
CPEN 342 - Embedded Computer Systems
Credits: 3.00
The micro controller as an engineering component. Hardware expansion with analog and digital devices. Board level design of real-time systems. Design of user-friendly interactive displays. Design project. Troubleshooting with logic analyzer and in-circuit emulation. Three lecture hours per week.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Engineering
Pre-requisites: CPEN 231 Minimum Grade: D and EENG 304 Minimum Grade: D
CPEN 342L - Embedded Computer Systems Lab
Credits: 1.00
Three laboratory hours per week. Taken concurrently with CPEN 342.
Lab: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Engineering
Co-requisites: CPEN 342
CPEN 430 - Digital System Design
Credits: 3.00
Modern methods of digital design realization. Technology independence. Designs utilizing gate arrays and custom integrated circuits. Use of high level design software. Extensive use of Verilog hardware design language for system description, simulation and implementation. Three lecture hours per
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Engineering
Co-requisites: CPEN 430L
Pre-requisites: CPEN 230 Minimum Grade: D and CPSC 121 Minimum Grade: D
CPEN 430L - Digital System Design Lab
Credits: 1.00
Three laboratory hours per week. Taken concurrently with CPEN 430.
Other: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Engineering
Co-requisites: CPEN 430
CPEN 435 - Parallel Computing
Credits: 3.00
Parallel Programming platforms; principles of parallel algorithm design; basic communication operations; analytical modeling of parallel programs; programming using the message-passing paradigm (MPI); programming on shared address space platforms (POSIX Thread and OpenMP); and other advanced topics. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Engineering
Pre-requisites: CPEN 231 Minimum Grade: D
CPEN 436 - Biomedical Informatics & Comp
Credits: 3.00
Investigation of the role of computers in the provision of medical services; study of the nature of clinical data, medical information exchange standards, data storage, retrieval, integration and analysis and privacy issues; medical decision-making support; design of healthcare information systems; genomic medicine and its techniques. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Engineering
Pre-requisites: CPEN 231 Minimum Grade: D
CPEN 481 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Courses of special interest may be offered from time to time. Prerequisites will depend on the nature of the material offered and will be announced.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Engineering
COMPUTER SCIENCE
CPSC 105 - Great Ideas in Comp Sci
Credits: 3.00
Computer science is the study of what is computable. Students will be introduced to computing technologies and learn how these technologies are applied in today's world. The course will focus on the relationship between computation, technology, and society. Topics could include robotics, artificial intelligence, bio-computing, media computing, technology from the movies, and technology and art. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
CPSC 107 - User Centered Web Site Design
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to quality design principles and user-centered development techniques used in creating a web site. Topics will include human-computer interaction, graphical design, prototyping, and introduction to web programming. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
CPSC 110 - Special Topics for Non Majors
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Computer Science topics of special interest to students majoring in other disciplines. Sample topics include principles of programming, web programming, and media computing. May not be counted towards a major in Computer Science. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Comp Sci & Computation Think
Computer Science
CPSC 121 - Computer Science I
Credits: 3.00
Techniques of problem-solving and algorithmic development. An introduction to programming. Emphasis is on how to design, code, debug, and document programs using good programming style. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
CPSC 122 - Computer Science II
Credits: 3.00
A continuation of CPSC 121. An examination of dynamic memory management and recursion; an introduction to basic data structures and algorithmic analysis. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 121 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 211 - Algorithmic Art
Credits: 3.00
Algorithmic Art sits at the intersection of mathematics, programming, algorithms, and art. The primary goal of the course is to teach computational thinking to liberal arts students. Student motivation is achieved by presenting programming and math concepts in the context of the visual arts. The assignments use the programming environment called Processing which was developed specifically for visual artists. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Sophomore
Freshman
CPSC 212 - Computational Modeling
Credits: 3.00
This course introduces students to the modeling process and computer simulations. It considers two major approaches: system dynamics models and agent-based models. A variety of software tools will be explored. Applications will be chosen from ecology, medicine, chemistry, biology, and others. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Sophomore
Freshman
CPSC 213 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topic to be determined by instructor.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
CPSC 214 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topic to be determined by instructor.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
CPSC 223 - Algorith &Abstract Data Struct
Credits: 3.00
Algorithm analysis using O-notation, sorting, heaps, balanced binary search trees, and hash tables. MATH 231 is a co-requisite or pre-requisite for this course. Fall and Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D and MATH 231 Minimum Grade: D and MATH 231 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 224 - Object-Ornt & Event Dr Prog
Credits: 3.00
Object-oriented topics like overloading, inheritance, and dynamic binding, memory management and event-driven programming. Introduction to object-oriented design. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 290 - Directed Reading
Credits: .00 to 3.00
Individual exploration of a topic not normally covered in the curriculum.
Other: .00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
CPSC 310 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 311 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 312 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 313 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 314 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122
CPSC 315 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 316 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 317 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 318 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 319 - Special Topics
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 321 - Database Management Systems
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to database concepts. A study of data models, data normalization, relational algebra. Use of data definition and data manipulation languages including embedded SQL. File and index organization. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 326 - Organization of Program. Lang.
Credits: 3.00
Examination of the structures and concepts of procedural, functional, and logic-based programming languages. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 346 - Operating Systems
Credits: 3.00
Study of operating systems internals. Topics include concurrent programming, memory management, file system management, scheduling algorithms, security. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPEN 231 Minimum Grade: D and CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 351 - Theory of Computation
Credits: 3.00
Study of the theory of computation. Regular grammars, finite state automata, context-free grammars, pushdown automata, Turing machines, parsing, normal forms, and the Chomsky hierarchy. Fall, odd years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D and MATH 231 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 353 - Applied Cryptography
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to applied cryptography. Topics could include classical cryptosystems (shift, affine, Vigenere, Playfair, Enigma), modern cryptosystems (DES, AES, RSA, El Gamal), key exchange protocols, digital signatures, security protocols, and zero-knowledge techniques, along with their applications in e-commerce and intelligence. Spring, even years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 360 - Intro to Robotics
Credits: 3.00
Computational techniques used in the development of intelligent, sensor-based robotic systems. Topics include manipulators, and mobile robots, forward and inverse kinematics, sensors, intelligent architectures, control approaches, environment mapping, and motion planning. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D and CPEN 231 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 410 - Advanced Topics
Credits: 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 411 - Advanced Topics
Credits: 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 412 - Advanced Topics
Credits: 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 413 - Advanced Topics
Credits: 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 414 - Advanced Topics
Credits: 3.00
Topics that reflect the current interests and expertise of the faculty. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 425 - Computer Graphics
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to the use of graphics primitives within a higher level language to produce two and three-dimensional images; underlying mathematical operations used to implement standard graphics packages; practical experience with current graphics systems. Fall, even years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D and MATH 231 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 427 - Artificial Intelligence
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to AI. Topics include automated reasoning, state space and heuristic search, knowledge representation formalisms, and stochastic methods. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 431 - Computer Architecture
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to fundamental concepts in the design and implementation of computing systems. Topics include fundamentals of computer design, performance and cost, instruction set architecture, computer arithmetic, data path control, processor technology, pipelining, memory system (caches, virtual memory). Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPEN 231 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 435 - Parallel Computing
Credits: 3.00
Parallel Programming platform; principles of parallel algorithm design; basic communication operations' analytical modeling of parallel programs; programming using the message-passing paradigm (MPI); programming on shared address space platforms (POSIX Thread and OpenMP); and other advanced topics. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPEN 231 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 436 - Biomedical Informatics&Comput
Credits: 3.00
Investigation of the role of computers in the provision of medical services; study of the nature of clinical data, medical information exchange standards, data storage, retrieval, integration and analysis and privacy issues; medical decision-making support; design of healthcare information systems' genomic medicine and its techniques. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPEN 231 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 447 - Data Communications
Credits: 3.00
Study of main components of computer communications and networks; communication protocols; routing algorithms; machine addressing and network services. Spring, odd years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 448 - Computer Security
Credits: 3.00
Study of security and information assurance in stand-alone and distributed computing. Topics include ethics, privacy, access control methods and intrusion detection. Fall.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 450 - Design & Analysis-Comp Algorim
Credits: 3.00
Advanced study of computer algorithms not covered in CPSC 223 along with principles and techniques of computational complexity. Topics could include dynamic programming, B-trees, minimum spanning trees, Floyd and Warshall algorithms, various string matching algorithms, computational geometry, exponential growth of round-off errors, Np-completeness and reducibility. Spring, odd years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D and MATH 231 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 455 - Chaos & Dynamical Systems
Credits: 3.00
Introduction to the study of discrete nonlinear dynamical systems and their chaotic behavior. The course will focus on investigation s through computer experiments- both numerical and graphical- and the corresponding mathematical analysis of the observed behavior. A significant portion of the course will be devoted to designing graphics programs. In the humanistic tradition of Gonzaga, students will also learn the historical development of the modern science of chaotic dynamical systems. On sufficient demand.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: MATH 231 Minimum Grade: D and CPSC 122 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 475 - Speech&NaturalLangProcessing
Credits: 3.00
Computational approaches to language processing: morphology, phonetics, speech recognition, syntax, and semantics. Emphasis on statistical language processing. Fall, even years.
Lecture: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Pre-requisites: CPSC 223 Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 490 - Directed Reading
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Individual exploration of a topic not normally covered in the curriculum. Arrangement with an instructor.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
CPSC 491 - Software Engineering
Credits: 2.00
A survey of approaches used in software engineering focusing on software development processes, requirements engineering, estimation, scheduling, risk analysis, testing, version control, and project management. Students apply the techniques and practices learned in their senior design projects, including the development of a detailed project plan and a functional software prototype. Fall.
Lecture: 2.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Comp Sci & Computation Think
Computer Science
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
Co-requisites: CPSC 491L, CPSC 499
CPSC 491L - Senior Design Project Lab I
Credits: 1.00
First semester of a two semester senior design project in which students work in teams to develop a large software product. Teams meet weekly with their faculty project advisors. Fall.
Lab: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Comp Sci & Computation Think
Computer Science
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
Co-requisites: CPSC 491, CPSC 499
CPSC 492L - Senior Design Project Lab II
Credits: 3.00
Second semester of a two semester senior design project in which students work in teams to develop a large software product. Teams meet weekly with their faculty project advisors. Spring.
Lab: 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Comp Sci & Computation Think
Computer Science
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
Pre-requisites: CPSC 491 Minimum Grade: D and CPSC 491L Minimum Grade: D
CPSC 495 - Thesis I
Credits: 1.00
First of a two semester senior thesis project. Requires arrangement with a faculty supervisor.
Lecture: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Computer Science
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
CPSC 496 - Thesis II
Credits: 1.00
Second of a two semester senior thesis project. Requires arrangement with a faculty supervisor.
Lecture: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Computer Science
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
Pre-requisites: CPSC 495 Minimum Grade: S
CPSC 497 - Computer Science Internship
Credits: .00 to 3.00
Computer Industry Internship.
Other: .00 to 3.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
CPSC 499 - Computers and Society
Credits: 1.00
This course discusses ethical, societal, security and legal issues in computing, including their relationship to professional development. Topics are examined within the context of students' senior design projects. Fall.
Other: 1.00
College: School of Engineering/Appl Sci
Department: Computer Science
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Comp Sci & Computation Think
Computer Science
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
Co-requisites: CPSC 491, CPSC 491L
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CRIM 101 - Intro to Criminal Justice
Credits: 3.00
A critical analysis of the way the American criminal justice system operates, focusing on the nature of law, the police, and the courts.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
CRIM 190 - Directed Reading
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
CRIM 193 - FYS:
Credits: 3.00
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces new Gonzaga students to the University, the Core Curriculum, and Gonzaga’s Jesuit mission and heritage. While the seminars will be taught by faculty with expertise in particular disciplines, topics will be addressed in a way that illustrates approaches and methods of different academic disciplines. The seminar format of the course highlights the participatory character of university life, emphasizing that learning is an active, collegial process.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
CRIM 240 - Issues in Law Enforcement
Credits: 3.00
Examines current issues in law enforcement such as corruption, brutality, use of deadly force, politics and policy administration, resource management, stress, community relations, and major court decisions.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
CRIM 352 - Corrections
Credits: 3.00
An examination of the American correctional system, from its origins to the present day. Focuses on philosophical and policy issues and debates that confront our society in attempting to deal with criminal offenders. Field trips to correctional facilities.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
CRIM 355 - Elite & White Collar Deviance
Credits: 3.00
This course examines deviance and crimes committed by organizations and the rich and powerful. The nature, extend and societal effects of various types of elite and white collar deviance are examined.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Criminal Justice
Sociology
May not be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Freshman
CRIM 357 - Inequality, Crime & Urban Life
Credits: 3.00
This course examines the relationship between inequality and crime in America’s inner cities. Students will consider how cultural, economic, educational, legal, political, and other factors shape life in urban areas, and how these factors reproduce crime and inequality in America’s inner cities.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Freshman
CRIM 361 - Crime & Gender
Credits: 3.00
An exploration of the ways in which gender influences who is and is not considered criminal, why women are often socialized to be the victims of crime and men the perpetrators of such actions, and how such behaviors are used to maintain and support pre-existing inequalities. As such, special attention will also be paid to how issues of social class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation often temper these societal outcomes.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Freshman
CRIM 365 - Comparative Criminal Justice
Credits: 3.00
A comparison of criminal justice systems from around the world using the Internet and a seminar format.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
CRIM 386 - Criminal Law
Credits: 3.00
Substantive criminal law; principles, functions, and limits; basic crime categories with extensive case analysis; state and national legal research materials.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Freshman
CRIM 390 - American Court System
Credits: 3.00
A hands-on class conducted by a Superior Court Judge. Students observe actual trials and are instructed about the proceedings by the judge.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Freshman
CRIM 391 - Directed Study
Credits: .00 to 3.00
Other: .00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
CRIM 395 - Topics in Criminal Justice
Credits: 3.00
Specific topics to be chosen by faculty.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
CRIM 396 - Topics in Criminal Justice
Credits: 3.00
Specific topics to be chosen by faculty.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Freshman
CRIM 397 - Topics in Criminal Justice
Credits: 3.00
Specific topics to be chosen by faculty.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Freshman
CRIM 398 - Topics in Criminal Justice
Credits: 3.00
Specific topics to be chosen by faculty.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Freshman
CRIM 399 - Topics in Criminal Justice
Credits: 3.00
Specific topics to be chosen by faculty.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Freshman
CRIM 432 - CIS:
Credits: 3.00
The Core Integration Seminar (CIS) engages the Year Four Question: “Imagining the possible: What is our role in the world?” by offering students a culminating seminar experience in which students integrate the principles of Jesuit education, prior components of the Core, and their disciplinary expertise. Each section of the course will focus on a problem or issue raised by the contemporary world that encourages integration, collaboration, and problem solving. The topic for each section of the course will be proposed and developed by each faculty member in a way that clearly connects to the Jesuit Mission, to multiple disciplinary perspectives, and to our students’ future role in the world.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
CRIM 480 - Crim/Civil Trial Procedure
Credits: .00 or 3.00
Full court case preparation in a year-long mock trial team environment, including knowledge of the law, opening and closing statements, directs, redirects, cross-examinations, courtroom procedure and demeanor. Formal American Mock Trial competition takes place during spring semester, at the end of which credit will be granted for successful completion of the course. Intended only for those with a serious interest in law. Cannot be repeated for credit.
Lecture: .00 or 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Freshman
CRIM 490 - Dir Read in Criminal Justice
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Supervised readings in the criminal justice area.
Other: 1.00 to 4.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
CRIM 494 - Senior Thesis
Credits: 3.00
Students with a 3.70 GPA in the Criminal Justice major and a 3.30 overall GPA who wish to graduate with Departmental Honors in Criminal Justice must enroll in CRIM 494 two semesters prior to their graduation and complete an honors thesis. The thesis may be a significant expansion of the student's work in SOCI 204 or CRIM 499. A committee of three faculty members will direct the thesis. Two members of the committee must be from the Criminal Justice/Sociology Department, and one may be from another department. The chair of the committee will be the instructor of record. The committee's decision about whether to award Departmental Honors is independent of the course grade.
Other: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
CRIM 495 - SPD Cooperative Education
Credits: 1.00
The course involves a 40 hour training academy and a commitment of at least 20 hours a month to the Spokane Police Department. Students will provide low priority responses to citizen needs such as property recovery and accident reporting. Student must be enrolled in this course prior to beginning the academy training. This course may be taken twice, for up to 2 credits total.
Other: 1.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Criminal Justice
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
CRIM 496 - Practicum in Criminal Justice
Credits: 1.00 to 3.00
Supervised experience for Criminal Justice majors in selected criminal justice agencies such as The Spokane County Prosecutor's Office, The Spokane County Public Defender's Office, or the Spokane County Juvenile Court.
Other: 1.00 to 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
CRIM 497 - Criminal Justice Internship
Credits: .00 to 6.00
Practical experience working in the Criminal Justice field. Internships are individually arranged and may be done in a wide array of settings.
Other: .00 to 6.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study:
Criminal Justice
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Junior
Senior
CRIM 499 - Criminal Theory & Measurement
Credits: 3.00
An advanced class in criminological theory and methods. In a seminar format, students will review and discuss current criminological research and theories. Required of all Criminal Justice majors and fulfills the comprehensive examination degree requirement. Spring.
Lecture: 3.00
College: College of Arts & Sciences
Department: Sociology & Criminal Justice
Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges:
College of Arts & Sciences
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major Fields of Study:
Criminal Justice
Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes:
Senior
Pre-requisites: ( SOCI 304 Minimum Grade: D or SOCI 204 Minimum Grade: D ) and ( SOCI 350 Minimum Grade: D or SOCI 351 Minimum Grade: D or SOCI 353 Minimum Grade: D )


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